Anyone use "Heat Mirror" windows?


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Old 09-24-08, 12:02 PM
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Anyone use "Heat Mirror" windows?

We'd like to replace our nearly 40 year old aluminum sliding windows before winter and are looking at the "Heat Mirror" windows from American Window Authority in Pennsylvania. Does anyone have any first hand experience with these?

http://www.windjammerwindows.com/energy/index.html

My last house had crappy windows even though they were new in 2001 when that house was built, and I want to make sure I get good ones this time in our new house. Thanks.

Mark
 
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Old 09-24-08, 05:13 PM
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We used to handle a line of windows that featured Heat Mirror as their premium glass package. The Heat Mirror itself is actually a clear plastic film with reflective properties, that goes in between the 2 panes of glass. In a way, it's kind of like a triple-pane IGU. We had good results with it. It has a good u-factor, but the IGU's still get some edge condensation along the bottom in the wintertime, especially on the coldest of days and especially if the humidity is above 50-60% in your home.

We also installed commercial Heat Mirror in all the windows in our county courthouse. To date, only one of them has failed, and I think that was due to a breather tube that was not crimped.
 
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Old 09-26-08, 08:43 AM
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So in your opinion you think they are pretty good?

How come you no longer carry these windows?

Thanks.

Mark
 
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Old 09-26-08, 12:50 PM
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I sold windows with heat mirror glass packs and liked them so much I had it put in my home when I built a home 10 years ago. Be sure to get at least argon gas filled heat mirror windows.
 
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Old 09-26-08, 03:59 PM
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The company was gobbled up by a larger company that discontinued the former company's line of windows that we liked, and replaced them with inferior garbage.
 
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Old 09-26-08, 04:34 PM
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Do people really put these window in, up north? You'd think it be for only down south. Up north, wouldn't it be better to shade the windows in the summer (or a temporary film put on for south-west windows?), and leave them uncovered for solar gain for free heat in the winter?

An average sized house window can allow in about 5000 btu's of heat, I have heard (That is what typical 1500 watt electric space heaters generate, about). That might help in the winter. And some people have certain rooms where they design south facing rooms with banks of windows for that very purpose.
 
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Old 09-26-08, 10:08 PM
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There are actually several types of Heat Mirror, and all have different properties. Some are better than others in certain climates. Overall, windows are usually a net LOSS of energy in winter months, and Heat Mirror reflective coatings can help prevent heat from leaving the home by reflecting it back toward it's source rather than letting it conduct and radiate out the glass.

The u-value of the IGU is the bottom line for energy savings, and Heat Mirror has good marks.
 
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Old 09-27-08, 06:55 AM
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Several articles and studies I've seen all say that as a rule, any advantage to solar heat gain in the colder months is negligible. And it is totally offset by loss of efficiency in the summer month, thus higher cooling costs.

Basically, they say you want the window to just be a transparent portion of your wall, with the highest insulation and efficiency you can get. No heat or cold, out or in.
 
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Old 07-30-11, 07:18 PM
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Heat mirror is a great technology and a bit on the expensive side. Today's heat mirror is different, much better uv protection and the window manufacturers that now use it must comply with strict manufacturing methods. Specialized sealants must be used , this eliminates any seal failures. A very Impressive technology.
 
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Old 07-30-11, 07:43 PM
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This thread is an oldie but a goodie.
 
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Old 03-04-13, 10:15 AM
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As I heard from the past Heat Mirrow windows had problems with plastin instead of glass between panes. Sun affects plastic and causes damages. UV rays will start eroding it whatever companies are saying, because it's plastic which in my opinion cannot be comparable with glass. Plastic is always affected by sun and it's UV so in time it will start destructing. They say it's fixed right now, but in any case glass will always overlast plastic. Talking about durability and longevity, glass has way bigger advantage. You can reach the same other values and at the same time to have windows lasting for a way longer time.
 

Last edited by lawrosa; 03-04-13 at 10:49 AM. Reason: Removed link
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Old 03-04-13, 10:49 AM
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Closing old thread .
 
 

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