How to remove metal frame basement windows


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Old 10-14-08, 07:41 PM
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Question How to remove metal frame basement windows

I have 5 basement windows that are the standard metal frame with windows that tilt. Each opening measures 32X14. I would like to replace with vinyl thermalpane sliders. My question is, how are the metal frames removed from the openings?? The foundation is cinderblock. Does the concrete have to be chopped out??
 
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Old 10-15-08, 04:07 AM
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Welcome to the forums! Usually a chain and 4 wheel drive vehicle will do the best job....naw, just kidding. You will have to chip the bedding concrete from around the frame in order to remove them. Be aware, you will probably destroy the frames before you get them out. In addition, your windows will most likely need to be custom made. One more problem, the size you mention is not large enough for code compliant egress windows, so consider that, too.
 
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Old 10-15-08, 04:09 AM
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I often use the metal frames as a stop for the new windows, if the frames are in good condition. But to amswer the question, there is usually cement around the base and possibly the sides. It often falls out or is easy to chip out after a few whacks with a 3lb. mall. The sides will be set into slots in the block. Cut the top or bottom after knocking out the center divider, then bend the frame out of the slots.
 
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Old 10-15-08, 05:30 AM
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Once you've removed the sash, the best place to start is usually the top of the frame. You can usually hammer a prybar around the edge of the window on top and bend the metal down enough so that you can get a reciprocating saw blade in there and cut it in half. Once you've cut the top in half, you can bend the top down even farther and wiggle the frame around back and forth to loosen the sides. By collapsing the frame in toward the center of the window the whole frame will come out. You don't usually need to do a lot of cutting with the reciprocating saw aside from making that initial cut. The bottom is often filled solid with concrete, so trying to cut it will only dull your blade. If you do need to cut additional frame a 1/16" metal cutting abrasive wheel works well. Be sure you're wearing goggles and a dust mask.

Chip off the excess concrete with a hammer and cold chisel. Having a 4 1/2" grinder with a serrated diamond blade is handy to clean up rough concrete around the opening and in the corners.
 
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Old 10-15-08, 11:55 AM
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How to remove metal frame basement windows

Thanks to all for the suggestions.
For Chandler, do I need to be concerned with the issue of an egress window, even if I'm only replacing the frames that are currently there??
Also, regarding the suggestion to use the old frames as stops for the new windows, I'm assuming that to do that, the new windows would be installed from the basement, and just shim plumb in the opening and attach with Tapcons??
 
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Old 10-16-08, 04:19 PM
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If you are upgrading the basement to a living area or bedroom, you will need an egress window. Check with your local inspection department to see if there is any variance or grandfathering.
 
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Old 10-16-08, 06:25 PM
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what is an egress window?
 
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Old 10-16-08, 07:27 PM
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Thumbs up

Originally Posted by chandler
If you are upgrading the basement to a living area or bedroom, you will need an egress window. Check with your local inspection department to see if there is any variance or grandfathering.
Chandler, thanks. Thats not happening here, just time to get rid of the drafty windows, and install new ones, more energy efficient.
 
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Old 10-17-08, 03:47 AM
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Taser, it is an escape window that must meet certain space requirements. Usually the minimal measurements are 32 x 20, but can vary. It allows a means of escape from a basement in the event of an emergency should there be no accessible exit. They are required in all basement bedrooms.
Goodwood, roger that.
 
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Old 11-28-08, 08:19 PM
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It appears I've got an almost identical situation to GoodWood...5 drafty metal windows in the basement measuring approx 32x13. The smallest replacement windows I've found are 32x15 which would require cutting the concrete to fit them. Since I have to cut the concrete anyway I decided to purchase 32x17 thermastar windows that I found on clearance for $36.
The basement wall is block and the window has the angled concrete drip cap. My plan is to use my circular saw with a masonry blade to cut through the block (on the interior and exterior). See the photo included for where I plan to cut (about an inch or two off the top of the block). Does anyone foresee any problems with this plan? Will the circular saw with a masonry blade be sufficient? I'll use a recip saw for the metal window as described below. I'm assuming the block will cut easily and make a clean cut (except for all the dust, etc.) Thanks.

 
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Old 11-29-08, 04:00 AM
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Brdnstn, across the top of the window is probably a steel lintel, so don't cut above the existing frame of the window. Yes, you can cut the angled drip edge, as it is nothing but poured and formed concrete. Bear in mind, cutting more than 1" through the leading edge of your block will reveal a hollow core that must be dealt with. Likewise on the bottom course. You will most likely have to fill the block below your cut since you will be exposing the block core.
 
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Old 11-29-08, 04:21 PM
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The whole window frame is metal but above the frame at the top is a wooden sill plate I believe...so I'll definitely avoid cutting the sill plate. Another poster on this thread suggested prying the top of the metal frame and then making a cut and then prying the rest of the frame out. I really think I need to cut into the top of the block at the bottom of the window more than an inch so I'll probably need to fill the block core with concrete. If you refer to the photo, there are three blocks that will be cut. The two on the sides below the window will be cut in half down the middle. Is this a problem as far as load bearing is concerned? I wouldn't think so because I'm not really cutting that much out of it. Thanks.
 
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Old 09-08-09, 11:11 AM
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Originally Posted by brdnstn
It appears I've got an almost identical situation to GoodWood...5 drafty metal windows in the basement measuring approx 32x13. The smallest replacement windows I've found are 32x15 which would require cutting the concrete to fit them. Since I have to cut the concrete anyway I decided to purchase 32x17 thermastar windows that I found on clearance for $36.
The basement wall is block and the window has the angled concrete drip cap. My plan is to use my circular saw with a masonry blade to cut through the block (on the interior and exterior). See the photo included for where I plan to cut (about an inch or two off the top of the block). Does anyone foresee any problems with this plan? Will the circular saw with a masonry blade be sufficient? I'll use a recip saw for the metal window as described below. I'm assuming the block will cut easily and make a clean cut (except for all the dust, etc.) Thanks.



just wondering how old those metal frames are?.....my house is 12 years old...it has the superiorwall basemant with the metal frame in cement...my rust is just on the exterior...but is getting worse as time goes on...I am just going to wd40 the heck out of them and try and keep it from progressing.
 
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Old 09-28-09, 01:13 PM
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Anthonycrf450r, I actually haven't replaced them yet! I need to get on it.
 
 

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