replacement Installation question--


  #1  
Old 11-13-08, 05:28 PM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 136
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
replacement Installation question--

when we put in thenew window,sometimes there is a very small gap between the jamb and the window,not a wide gap. anyway,my installer said after we put the inside stops back on we just caulk. is he supposed to put some sort of insulation in there or no?
 
  #2  
Old 11-14-08, 03:52 AM
B
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Southeast, Pa
Posts: 321
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
If there is a gap around replacement windows I would usually stuff some insulation in there prior to installing the molding.
 
  #3  
Old 11-14-08, 04:46 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 136
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
stuff fiberglass insulation around the whole perimeter of the window or just where there are wide enough gaps?
 
  #4  
Old 11-14-08, 05:20 AM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,354
Received 60 Upvotes on 52 Posts
Insulation

Use a non-expanding foam. Insulation will deform the jamb if put in too tightly. If the jamb gets deformed, the window will not open and shut properly.
 
  #5  
Old 11-14-08, 06:02 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 136
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
fiberglass insulation like the kind found in an attic or between walls can expand?
the kind in the can that does'nt expand,is that the blue can that is found at home depot in the window dept?
 
  #6  
Old 11-14-08, 06:20 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 5 Upvotes on 5 Posts
DAP TEX (maybe its the TEX-Plus now) window and door. Yes in a blue can, but it used to be in Paint.

Don't use the Great Stuff, it's way to messy and hard to clean up.

Fiberglass, if stuffed in to tight can deform the frame. And its lousy at sealing air leaks. The foam is a good way to accomplish both.
 
  #7  
Old 11-14-08, 06:40 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 136
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
i heard the stuff in the BLUE CAN is not good because after its applied,its extremely difficult to remove the window.
 
  #8  
Old 11-14-08, 07:05 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 5 Upvotes on 5 Posts
Not true...You can cut through it easily with a jab saw or even a bread knife. I've even used a putty knife. Besides, why would you need to remove the window any time in the forseeable future?

All the expert installers that I've known use the foam. Mike Holmes does too...lol.
 
  #9  
Old 11-14-08, 07:27 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 136
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
do you apply it before you install the replacement along the whole(square) perimeter or do you only apply after you install in problem area's only?
 
  #10  
Old 11-14-08, 07:44 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 5 Upvotes on 5 Posts
I just re-read and realized this is a replacement window, not a full window. Slept in a bit today...sorry...lol.

Put foam in the areas that are open after install, before the stops. If there are uneven gaps, it sounds like the wood frame is warped or out of square. Normally a replacement fits the old frame with an even gap. Although w/o actually seeing the gaps you are talking about, it may not be worth it. If you don't have a continous barrier of spray foam from top to bottom, you don't gain much.

Your installer is probably doing ok, though I would put a bead of caulk in any gaps small enuf for caulk, then install the stop before it was set up. Then caulk the stop as well.

Is this an outside install or inside?
 
  #11  
Old 11-14-08, 08:04 AM
T
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 136
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
inside install. when you say a continuous,you mean that the gap is continuous from top to bottom or side to side?
 
  #12  
Old 11-14-08, 08:18 AM
Gunguy45's Avatar
Super Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 19,281
Received 5 Upvotes on 5 Posts
I meant a continous bead of foam from top to bottom is effective. Only putting foam in on 6" of the side really doesn't accomplish much as the rest of the space between the old and new has no foam. Air and cold will just leak past in the unfoamed area.

But the gap should be the same on both sides and relatively even from top to bottom, so that the window is even in the opening. There will be some variation from one window to the next due to manufacturing tolerances in both the old and new window.

If the gap forms a narrow "V" from top to bottom on the left side and an upside down narrow "V" (or "A" look) on the right side, than either your old frame or new window is not square.

If the gap varies from top to bottom ( 1/4" at the bottom, 1/8 in the middle, 1/4" at the top), then either your wood frame is bowed in, or the replacement is bowed out.

See what I'm getting at?

The old frame is really nothing to worry about, as you can't really change it, but you want your replacements to be installed square and plumb or they may leak air or not operate smoothly.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: