creating window frames-----???

Reply

  #1  
Old 11-17-08, 06:36 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 141
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
creating window frames-----???

when creating new window frames from scratch...how many 2x4's between each window? say you want 3 double hung windows right next to each other and dont want then to come together in one large frame.
how many 2 x 4's for the jamb? do we also install a 2x6 for the jamb?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 11-17-08, 11:37 AM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Southeast, Pa
Posts: 358
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I am assuming you already have some windows you want to use, correct? I do not understand the question about the jamb. Each window usually has a jamb or are these just pieces of glass or sashes you are trying to use? If you are trying to make the windows you need to use 1x or 5/4 material not 2x for the jamb and frame. If this is the case you need to re-think it. To make a good window that does not leak takes a level of skill and knowledge, (not to mention equipment) I'm not sure even I would want to try it when there are inexpensive alternatives out there.
 
  #3  
Old 11-17-08, 12:11 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 141
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
no bill, not glass,the whole window. i know most windows have a 4 9/16 jamb. how big should the rough opening jamb be and what is that usually made of?
between each window i assume is a 2x4? how many between each window? how are those posts constructed? how bout the corners?
thank you
 
  #4  
Old 11-17-08, 04:27 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Southeast, Pa
Posts: 358
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The rough opening is usually 1/2" - 3/4" larger than the unit. If your window has trim on the outside or a mounting flange, measure from the back of the trim/flange to the inside of the jamb. This dimension is how thick the wall needs to be. If the dimension is 4-9/16" then frame with 2x4 / 1/2" ply / 1/2" drywall. If it is 6-9/16" the studs are 2x6 with the same drywall and plywood. If the number is larger than either of these you should be able to remove part of the jamb (called the extension jamb) to make it fit. If the dimension is smaller you can add an extension jamb to fit your wall size. The posts between the windows can be whatever size you feel appropriate. They are made of whatever size studs the wall is built out of. The same for the corners. I would frame the wall on either side of the window to get as much insulation in as possible.

I hope this helps.
 
  #5  
Old 11-17-08, 05:31 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: northeast
Posts: 141
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
most replacement windows or new construction today have a
4 9/16 jamb? when you sayuse a 2x4,is it actually 2 2x4's,one on each side. in other words 2 that are side by side. ?
 
  #6  
Old 11-17-08, 08:00 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Central, IL.
Posts: 109
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
If your installing new construction windows they have a mounting flange. This mounting flange covers the side of a 2x4. The flagne is 1 1/2" wide all the way around the window. So yes, you need at least 2 2x4 next to each other to hang two windows next to each other. However, you can order a double wide double hung window that will fit a larger opening without any 2x4 between each window unit. The manufacture will install the support between each unit and ship both windows as one assemble. You box out the frame with 2x lumber leaving a 1/2 - 3/4" gap on all four sides. You will need shims to level, center the window in the rough opening. You will also need to out silicone chalking all the way around the rough opening under the mounting lfange. This seals the unit to teh wall and keeps stops air movement. You will also need two types of expanding foam insualation, one between the new rough opening and one between the new window and rough frome. There is a special expanding foam for around the new windows, it wont expand enough to push and distort the window frames. It is also a good idea to lay a row of insulation between any studs you nail togehter.

Read the instructions, there are other things to make the windows sealed. Most manufactures have installation instructions on-line.
 
  #7  
Old 11-17-08, 09:50 PM
Member
Join Date: Nov 2004
Location: plainfield, IL
Posts: 77
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by taser View Post
most replacement windows or new construction today have a
4 9/16 jamb? when you sayuse a 2x4,is it actually 2 2x4's,one on each side. in other words 2 that are side by side. ?
Replacement windows have a frame depth of 3 1/4". I am only guessing you might be trying to create a frame to put a replacement unit into. If you are I have come up with a method that works for me in this scenario. I use a 1x6 to create a box frame that will have a finish opening for my replacement window which is 1/2" bigger on the width and 3/8 on the height. I then install(shims, plum, level, square) this box frame in my Rough opening made from 2X4's also 1/2" on width bigger 3/8" on height from my box frame unit dimension. The inside of the "jamb" from the new box frame should be flush with where your drywall will be.(ex. 1/2" inside the 2x framing for 1/2" drywall) Then I use a 1X2 (3/4 X 1 1/2) for a outside stop screwed in with the outsides of the 1x's flush with each other. Set the repacement in your opening. Now if my math is correct we should have

5 1/2" - 1 1/2" - 3 1/4" = 3/4"

SO..... I use either a piece of 3/4 quarter round or square or stock or base shoe or anything 3/4" to bring you flush with the inside of your jamb or box frame from 1X6. Casings cover the drywall and wrap the exterior with aluminum VOILA!

You can buy actuall jamb material but a 1x6 usually does the trick and is cheaper.

As far as how many 2X4's to put in between windows that's entirely up to you to decide what kind of look you're going for.
 
  #8  
Old 11-18-08, 02:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Southeast, Pa
Posts: 358
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Most new windows are installed in 2x4 or 2x6 walls that are sheathed with 1/2" plywood and have 1/2" drywall inside, therefore they have 4-9/16" or 6-9/16" jambs. A newly framed window opening should have a king stud and a minimum of one jack stud on each side of the opening holding the header in place. The king stud goes up along side of the header and the jacks go under it to carry the weight. I would not use a replacement window in a new installation. There is no way to properly seal the unit to keep water from getting to the frame and rotting it out.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: