Masonite Pre-Hung Door

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Old 01-06-09, 04:33 AM
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Masonite Pre-Hung Door

I recently bought a special order pre-hung masonite door and had to modify the frame head pieces by approx. 1/2 inch. Is it possible to cut about 9/16 inch off of the hinge side of the door and still be structurally stable along the long side of door for new hinge preparation?
 
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Old 01-06-09, 04:51 AM
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Welcome to the forums! What was the feature that caused you to have to "special order" a Masonite door? Why did you have to modify the frame header? Cutting a special order door isn't cool, so fill us in on the above questions before you do anything. Why is 9/16" cut needed? Why do you need to do a "new hinge" prep on a prehung door? Lotta questions, sorry.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 06:02 AM
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I had originally planned for a 2'6" door for the opening and had a 33"+ rough opening. The millwork salesman at Lowes convinced me that a 2'8" door would work but would be very tight. The frame would not fit. They were special order due to going in a 2x6 stud wall. If I end up cutting off the hinge side of door I will have to recess for hinges.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 06:20 AM
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Well, you must have gotten the dumb sales guy. Anyway, you only have about 1 1/4" inches of real wood on the sides, if that. I've seen some closer to only 1". If you have to trim the door, you'll have to take almost equal amounts off each side, sorry. Taking it all off one side will not leave enough wood to bite into and will reduce the strength. It will also move the panels closer to the hinge side, and I guarantee you'll notice it everytime you walk through the door. Taking 3/16-1/4 off the latch side should still give you room for your handleset to work ok. Check the clearance with the latch inserted.

Heres a hint, take your razor knife and cut the outline of the hinges deeper before you trim. Much easier than measuring, marking and cutting afterwards. Don't mortice them, just cut the outline.

Also, don't forget to break the sharp corners slightly.

As an Ex-millwork sales guy for the Orange Box, I apoligize for the Lowes guy.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 07:06 AM
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Thanks gunguy,

If I cut any off the latch side of the door is'nt that going to put my lockset too close to the strike to operate correctly based on the bore location on that side of door? Are you proposing that I bore a wider hole by 1/4" for lockset?

Thanks
jth1956
 
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Old 01-06-09, 07:24 AM
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Thats why I mentioned it. Depends on the lockset you use. Some, the latch mechanism is short enough, but you need to see how much you could shave off so the handle will still cover the hole and the latch doesn't hang up on anything. If its a hollow door, there shouldn't be much of an issue, though you might have to gouge out a little of the locking block towards the center of the door. The main thing is will the handle cover the hole ok, if its shifted over 3/16 or so.

You recognized what I was trying to bring up, you'll have to just check and measure. Not an issue with an unbored slab of course, but since the hole is there, yes it can be.

If it won't cover the hole, then really you may just have to cut the hinge side and see if you can live with the look, and if it holds up. If you can't or it doesn't, then you could always order a new slab pre cut and bored to the size you need, but I know they can be pricey.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 01:50 PM
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Basically what you have (in southern terms) is a pig in a poke. You were sold something you didn't need, by someone who didn't know what they were doing, and are trying to put a 20 pound butt in a 15 pound pair of pants.
Go to a lumber yard, ask for a 2-6 x 6-8 prehung Masonite with a 5 9/16" jamb (L or R swing). They will probably have them in stock or a day out without "special order" goofiness. Use the old slab for a yard sale table top and chalk it up to experience. You are probably not going to get the door to fit the opening well by cutting it up.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 03:39 PM
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The other guys have beaten you up already so i will just say......I don't know how many times I have warned people about big box stores, they still go there. It simply baffles me. They sell you something you don't want or need for an exorbitant price, and it does not fit when you get it. Go to you local lumberyard. They know their products, and are usually cheaper, since you don't have to go back.

From the sound of things, the new door has to go in or you have a big empty hole. If you must cut framing, CAREFULLY measure multiple times!!!! You have stated that there is no room on the latch side, so trim on the hinge side. BUT, do not cut the door or the jambs. You can trim out some framing, but only some.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 03:58 PM
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Well, Bill...it depends on the person. I agree 99.5 percent of the time you will get the right stuff the first time at a lumberyard/building supply with people that know their jobs. It would be my first choice to go to a local yard if available, but sometimes thats not an option. And it all depends on the person you get.

In my small town, there are no other options. Others may be in the same situation.

It's obvious the sales guy was wrong, but don't condemn eveyone for his mistake.
I had a customer who brought me his plans, and I ordered his windows and doors correctly, gave hime the specs, told him the measurements, but he framed everything at frame size, not RO. He was pi$$ed, but it was his fault, not mine.

Not that the OP has that issue, just saying what happened.

There are good people and bad everywhere.

Buyer beware. Knowledge is power.

No pi$$ing contest here, ok?
 
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Old 01-06-09, 06:30 PM
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You didn't say if this door was going in a load bearing wall or not, but I'd leave the door alone. Instead, remove one 2x6 trimmer and replace it with a 1x6 to gain 3/4" of room in your rough opening. Doing that would make your RO 33 3/4... plenty of room for your door.

Not something that a framing inspector would like to see, but I wouldn't lose any sleep over doing it on an opening that size.
 
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