need advice on retrofit vs. new construction


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Old 01-06-09, 10:23 AM
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need advice on retrofit vs. new construction

Hello all,

Searched the forums and didn't seem to find a lot of info on retrofit vs. new construction vinyl replacement windows on a stucco home.

From what I've been able to glean off the net, new construction is more costly, takes longer. But generally leaves you with a larger window area and w/out the large retrofit flange on the outside. I've also seen botch jobs in my neighborhood where the stucco patch/repair is very noticeable and does not match.

Retrofit is cheaper and faster. But reduces the window size and has the large flange on the outside.

I've heard mixed reports on leaking such that either will if not done properly, but most seem to suggest that new construction is better in this area.

The few showrooms we visited had the salespersons pushing new construction as the way to go, although I have a feeling they are hungry for labor/installation, especially in this economic environment, and that might influence their advice

I'm leaning towards retrofit on most windows as they are already quite large to begin with, so losing the 1-2" around the outside window wouldn't be so bad. And the fact that I've seen some new construction jobs that look bad. Why risk it?

However I have 2 windows that are not so large on the 2nd floor bedrooms where I really don't want to lose window area, so here I'm leaning towards new construction.

Any suggestions?

I also have a question on outside trim, and how that might affect my decision on retrofit/new construction. At least one window has a wood trim around it, perhaps a 1"x3" or 1"x4". I saw a milgard video where they scored and removed the outside flange of a retrofit to fit inside the trim. Seemed a little strange to me as I figure the flange is there for a reason, such as sealing and stability. Would the other option be to remove the existing trim and then put in the retrofit?

Finally, can I add outside wood trim to a retrofit on top of the flange? I assume I'd have to "channel" the wood trim to fit over the retrofit flange?

Thanks a lot, appreciate your input!
 
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Old 01-06-09, 01:41 PM
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Welcome to the forums! You may have it backwards. The new construction windows will have the nailing fin on the outside, while the replacement windows will be smooth edged to fit in an existing casement. Generally, replacement windows will, well, "replace" the window you remove with only a slight loss of edge.
Digest this and let us know if we can help further.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 02:07 PM
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@ Chandler...hey buddy, don't know where the OP is, but I know its different over in the western states. Was a bit wierd to me too. Since many windows out here are aluminum, and the mentioned stucco construction, they do it different. The orig windows are normally pretty flush with the exterior, and instead of cutting out all the frames, they make them to kind of cover the old frame and protrude past the original opening. Basically you take the sashes out and put the new one in, caulking the flange (which is the outermost part of the replacement window) underneath.

I didn't comment as I understand the principal, but haven't done it myself yet.
 
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Old 01-06-09, 02:10 PM
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Thanks!

Actually, from what I've seen the retrofit windows here in California (such as Milgard) have a reasonably wide flange on the outside of the window that gets sealed against the aluminum frame and then caulked around the edges onto the stucco. Such as this:

http://www.dpdoor.com/images/brent%2...g%20window.jpg

While new construction they chisel away the stucco and remove the old frame, then secure the window to the framing via the nailing fin. Then they repair the stucco back up to the edge of the new window.
 
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Old 01-08-09, 05:35 PM
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Well, kiss my grits. Yeah, I see, but it actually isn't technically a "flange", but a frame trim. I see how it goes on stucco. Never dealt with that before, just common woodframe construction. Thanks for the heads up, GG.
 
 

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