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What is the standard size of an internal door?

What is the standard size of an internal door?

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Old 04-18-09, 01:12 AM
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What is the standard size of an internal door?

In a house, there are multiple sizes of doors. One has a broken panel and they want it fixed. I suggested that it would probably be cheaper to replace the door than repair the broken panel.

The door size is 32 x 80.

But all the other doors in the house vary in widths, some wider and many narrower. What is the standard width?
 
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Old 04-18-09, 04:50 AM
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Doors

There is no one standard width. Sizes usually are in 4 inch increments beginning with 24 in. (24,28,32,36)
 
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Old 04-18-09, 05:35 AM
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The houses built in the 60's and 70's seemed to use a lot of 24" doors but today 30" doors seem to be used more..... that said, wirepuller is correct there isn't really a standard. Sizes are often dicated by the architect's design, home owner's preference or in some locales - handicap codes.

What type of door is broken? solid wood? masonite?
 
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Old 04-18-09, 06:52 AM
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What WP stated is true, but there are guidelines.

ADA home:
Bedroom, Bathroom, & Passage doors, and ADA accessible clothes closets: 36 [915mm] (32 [813mm] opening width required for wheelchair passage between stops [or jambs if stop-less, or when hospital stops used] & includes door width when open). Linen closet 24 [610mm]. ADA accessible bypass closet minimum 66 [1676mm], else varies widely. Garage separation 36. Air handler 36 (when entire home is a return air pendulum).


1st Floor Non ADA home:
Bedroom 32. Bathroom 30, 32,(28 [712mm] cramped). Clothes closets: 32 master bed , 30,(28 cramped) secondary. Linen closet: 18~24 [457mm~610mm]. Secondary Passage 30, 32,(28 cramped). Garage separation 36, 32. Air handler 32. Bypass varies widely. 2nd Floor bedrooms (smaller home) 30.

The standards for non ADA homes have existed since the 1930s. That doesn't mean everyone has followed them. ADA access is federally mandated, is more recent.
 
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Old 04-18-09, 11:30 AM
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For the 36 years I've been framing, until about 6 years ago, the standard in new houses around here are:

2'6" bedrooms------- 2'4" bathrooms-------- 3' entry (required)-------

2'8" laundry room (to pass washer, dryer) --------- 3' garage/house (to pass refer, stove, cabs.) But lately........ Be safe, GBAR
 
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Old 04-19-09, 09:00 AM
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That is a standard size. There are piles of easy replacements out there. Matching the style is the only issue.
 
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Old 04-19-09, 04:34 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
The houses built in the 60's and 70's seemed to use a lot of 24" doors but today 30" doors seem to be used more..... that said, wirepuller is correct there isn't really a standard. Sizes are often dicated by the architect's design, home owner's preference or in some locales - handicap codes.

What type of door is broken? solid wood? masonite?

The particular door in question looks like this:



The bottom right panel is broken.
 
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Old 04-19-09, 04:55 PM
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Looks like a standard Masonite faced door. Would need trimming and fitting, but should be a common item at most any home center or full service hardware/building supply.

I've heard and seen the results of repairing similar hollow core doors (with newspaper /cardboard and spackle, not always good), but it's just as simple to replace and repaint for most people.

You need to match the beading of the panels (if thats important to the owner), but its a pretty simple job for a good craftsman or handyman.
 
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Old 04-20-09, 03:49 AM
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Ya, I agree, it looks like masonite.

Since I usually paint the doors and seldom install any, I'm not fimiliar with brands and such but that looks like the type of masonite panel door that doesn't have the fake wood grain. Some do and some don't so you may want to pay attention to that when you look for a replacement.

If you do opt to repair, cut out the damged area, insert a piece of wood the same size as the hole and slightly thinner than the door and glue it in place [if necessary use a nail on the other side] and spackle over the patch. Sand when dry, prime and it should be ready to paint. Those type doors aren't all that expensive so replacing makes more sense ........ unless you have a plenty of free time and not much money
 
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