Replacing windows questions


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Old 05-03-09, 11:56 AM
W
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Replacing windows questions

My house has seven double-hung windows that are 70 years old and in bad shape. I'd like to replace them but have a few questions. Here is an image of what I am dealing with:



I'd like to just do sash replacement type windows. From what I can tell, a couple of them might need the sill replaced due to some rot. For the others that don't need the sill replaced, what should I do to protect them? I'm assuming the best time to replace/repair the sill is when you remove the old sashes for replacing.

Regarding the aluminum storm windows/screens: Do I just remove and ditch these when I install new windows, remove and rebuild them, or replace them? It seems like the storm window design is what led to the deterioration of the sills: When they are opened (like during the summer), rain can pool behind the aluminum frame on the sill.

Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-03-09, 04:05 PM
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Typical older house situation. The old storms go to recycling, modern L0-E glass eliminates the need for storms, and most storms will not fit under new replacement windows.

Rotted sills can be reapired and the others wrapped with aluminum to prevent further mositure problem and maintenance. You are correct in you assesment. There are small drain slots in the storms to let water out. Too often they get caulked over or blocked by debris which results in rotted sills.

When considering replacement windows, avoid local window companies that may not be around if you needs parts for service. Lifetime warranties are useless if the company is not there when you need them. I prefer national companies with long track records for service or at least regional companies. Big box stores do not have any of the above. If they advertise windows at $199, installed, run the other way.
 
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Old 05-03-09, 04:31 PM
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Originally Posted by Just Bill
Typical older house situation. The old storms go to recycling, modern L0-E glass eliminates the need for storms, and most storms will not fit under new replacement windows.

Rotted sills can be reapired and the others wrapped with aluminum to prevent further mositure problem and maintenance. You are correct in you assesment. There are small drain slots in the storms to let water out. Too often they get caulked over or blocked by debris which results in rotted sills.

When considering replacement windows, avoid local window companies that may not be around if you needs parts for service. Lifetime warranties are useless if the company is not there when you need them. I prefer national companies with long track records for service or at least regional companies. Big box stores do not have any of the above. If they advertise windows at $199, installed, run the other way.
Thanks for the excellent info. One clarification: Are you recommending not getting replacement windows from a Lowes/HD?
 
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Old 05-04-09, 03:12 PM
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Yes, not from HD/Lowes. I consider those windows junk or slightly above junk, not worth the time/ effort. I say this with 24 yrs as a remodeler.
 
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Old 05-05-09, 08:41 AM
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More questions for you. I took a look from the outside yesterday. Here is an image as they currently look:



Any idea what that red arrow is pointing to (channel looking thing)? I'm assuming it was for yet another storm window type thing but I'm not certain.

here is what it looks like with the storm window and unknown channel removed:



The trim the arrow is pointing to looks like the most rotted part on all the windows.

So, seeing these images, what steps do you recommend? I'm thinking of ordering the windows and in the time it takes to get them delivered, replace the trim I pointed to and repair/cover the sills. Sound reasonable?

Thanks.
 
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Old 05-05-09, 03:36 PM
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Install quality vinyl replacement windows, which means nothing from big box stores, and nothing that advertises windows at $150 including installation. The sills look solid, so install new replacement windows, scrap the storms, wrap exterior trim with aluminum, forget them for the next 20 yrs.
 
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Old 05-05-09, 04:29 PM
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Thanks for the help Bill. Hopefully not going to annoy you, but one more question: What would you recommend for insulating/sealing while I'm doing this project? I know that air leaks around the window as well (under the stool, around the inside casing) and I'm sure that new windows caulked in will help, but should I be doing more?
 
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Old 05-07-09, 09:10 AM
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Hi guys-

Seems like a good place to ask this here – hope so. Followed your very interesting discussion. I have some old windows I need to deal with also. I’ve always been unclear with the quality issues with the big box stores like HD/Lowes. I certainly believe all the folks who say the big box store quality is lacking.

But I thought windows like Anderson and Pella are good quality? I see those in HD/Lowes. So does it mean that you could buy Anderson and Pella as long as you don’t get them at the big box store? In other words you would ask for Anderson or Pella someplace else, but they would be of different model numbers/types than the big box store carry. Or does it mean whatever brands the big box store carries stay away from those brands altogether?

Been confused about this with all kinds of stuff from the big box stores.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
 
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Old 05-07-09, 09:30 AM
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Andersen 200 and 400 series windows (vinyl clad wood frames) are the same wherever. If you see solid vinyl windows with Andersen labeling in a Box store in the Eastern parts of the country, they are probably made by Silverline and are not very good quality unless you are flipping a house or similar.

Looking at the East coast HD site, I see they are advertising "American Craftsman, an Andersen company". Andersen purchased Silverline about 4-5 yrs ago, Silverline makes A/C windows for HD.

I saw on the Andersen website that they have a 100 series, but they are only being marketed in the Western regions. Haven't seen one yet.

Many people (myself included) have had/seen problems with Pella windows, as well as with customer support and service. Some people love them, many others don't.
 
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Old 05-07-09, 09:56 AM
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Thanks gunguy. Think I’m starting to get it. Then there really is in fact some manufacturer consistency but you have to check the details of what it is exactly you are getting and be careful. When I was in HD I just saw the label Anderson and said to myself “hey – they’re supposed to be pretty good”. But I didn’t look into details. Certainly could have been American Craftsman/Silverline. Guess like anything else you really have to get into the details. Also good to know not everyone is in love with Pella.

Thanks again for the good info.
 
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Old 05-07-09, 03:37 PM
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yes, good idea to insualte around the old frames as well as the new. To insulate air gaps around the old frames, you will have to remove the interior trim. Do so carefully, since it is old, then it can be reinstalled. Insulate with NON- expanding foam. I prefer DAP foam, at big box, hardware stores. Urethane in the blue can is OK, but be careful, a little fills a lot of space, too much can bulge frames. Same thing around the new windows, although, with proper measurements, there will only be a small gap. Make sure to insulate under the vinyl sill of replacement windows.
 
 

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