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Gap between Window and Window Frame


lionsandwings's Avatar
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05-13-09, 08:34 PM   #1 (permalink)  
Gap between Window and Window Frame

I have small gaps between the window and window frame on a couple of my windows. The gap ranges from barely noticeable to about 1/8" where you can see light. The gap only runs about 3-4 inches up from the bottom (either the window or frame - maybe both) are not square.

I live in Phoenix with what I believe are double pain aluminum windows.

What can I use to fill the gap? I rarely open/close the windows so I was thinking of using some kind of weather stripping.

Any suggestions?

 
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05-14-09, 05:23 AM   #2 (permalink)  
It would be helpful if you would elaborate a little more
and perhaps even post a picture. There are many kinds of windows made from all sorts of products. Is your aluminum, vinyl or wood ?

A window is made up of several components

A sash ( I believe this is what you are refering to when you say window) is the part that goes up and down or side to side or out and in, and generally houses the glass.

The frame is what the sash's fit into.

 
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05-14-09, 08:44 AM   #3 (permalink)  

 
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05-14-09, 08:48 AM   #4 (permalink)  
Posted By: merlesdad There are many kinds of windows made from all sorts of products. Is your aluminum, vinyl or wood ?
Aluminum

Posted By: merlesdad A window is made up of several components

A sash ( I believe this is what you are refering to when you say window) is the part that goes up and down or side to side or out and in, and generally houses the glass.

The frame is what the sash's fit into.
The gap is between the sash and frame.

Thanks for the quick lesson on the correct definition.

I thought a little more background might be helpful. The windows are about 18 years old and are original to the house. When we moved in 2 years ago, we had 4-5 windows replaced (just the sash, not the frame) because the seal had broken. Over the past 2 years I have noticed a few more windows with moisture, not necessarily the same windows with the gaps.

 
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05-14-09, 09:04 PM   #5 (permalink)  
First, measure the sash for square. You can do this by removing it and checking the diagonals to see if they are the same. (compare top left to bottom right... bottom left to top right, they should be equal) If the sash is square, then it is probably the frame of the window that is out of square. It "could" be something in the bottom track of the window that is causing it to sit crooked. Or, it could be that the bottom rail of the window is bowed up in the center.

But when we used to have a sash that was out of square, we used to take it out, turn it on corner and bump the corner (the long diagonal corner) against a solid surface, like a carpeted floor. Sometimes that was enough to jerk the frame around the glass and would square the sash up. Provided there is some room and rubber spacers around the glass. If you "bump" it too hard, you'll break the glass... so I hesitate to mention it.

Check sashes for square... frame of the window for square... check bottom sill for straightness, and report back what you find.

Since your sashes look like they are coming apart at the corners, and the marine glazing boot around the perimeter of the glass doesn't look even, I'm guessing the sashes are out of square.

 
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05-16-09, 08:07 AM   #6 (permalink)  
I would just caulk it that would seal it up.

 
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05-16-09, 09:08 PM   #7 (permalink)  
The style of window that you have is probably an Acorn or A-Therm aluminum slider.Even if it is not one of those brands one thing is certain it is a "new construction window" meaning it was made to be installed while your house was made.New construction windows of this style have a nailing flange around the perimeter for mounting.Which makes it VERY unlikely that it would be that bad out of square to meet the jamb so "unevenly".I agree that the sash should actually be reglazed properly to begin with which requires taking it apart.For this I would remove the sash and bring it in to a glass shop as they can reglaze it with ease with very little risk of breakage .1st step slide the sash all the way to the left.(There is an anti lift in the header that will prevent you from lifting the panel out unless it is ALL THE WAY open.) 2nd step grab the sash securely with 1 hand on either side and lift up(you may need to rock it gently side to side while lifting to get it to start) once the bottom of your sash is high enough to clear the bottm rail,lean the bottom in and slide the sash down(you may need to repeat the rocking motion to get the top of the sash to slide out of the header as it has a tendancy to "grab it a little".)Take caution while removing the sash make sure you mantain a solid hold at all times!3rd flip the sash and examine the roller if it is bad you may need to remove the bottom rail to get it out.Once you do it can be identified by going online of visiting a local glass shop.If you feel your roller is fine write back and I can help you.But I'm most certain that's what it is.If you look where the to sash meet(the interlock) you will probably see an equal "coresponding gap".If not please take more pictures.Beer 4U2 DO NOT TRY TO "FILL THE GAP"!!!!

 
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05-16-09, 09:20 PM   #8 (permalink)  
I see that I missed the part where you said that you had some glass changed due to seal failure.(BTW They only changed your insulated glass unit not the whole sash) But if this is one of the sash that YOU had glass changed I would say they did a pretty shabby job and would not go back for the glass you need replaced in the future.If the roller is totally gone it was surley lost during the installation of your new glass.As they are known to fall out of the sash during installation.GL


Last edited by Gabe G; 05-16-09 at 09:24 PM. Reason: typo
 
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05-17-09, 08:03 AM   #9 (permalink)  
Gabe G is right when he says the window unit is a new contruction type aluminum window. Can't say about the brand, they all look so much alike. Depending on the part of the country your in, it could be any of about 50. However, that said, the issue is the same.

My take is slightly different, While the glazing job is obviously not well executed, It could be that the sash is not the problem. Depending on the age of the house, it could very well be that the house has settled to one corner. This would have a tendency to pull the window frame "out of square" because it is fixed to the house framing. The sash is free floating to some degree and would not necessarily be affected.

Obviously this is a lot more serious than a sash being out of square or a poor glazing job. Those seem to be more of a symptom than the problem.

Remember when the window was installed the house was new
and everything was square and plumb within tolerances, including the window. Something has changed that.

There will be other areas of your home that will provide clues, look for them, it may be sticking doors, creaky floors, crackes in the ceiling, thumping water lines or a myriad of other conditions.

If you can find someone with a transit or lazer lever it should be easy enough to at least diagnose. Fixing it is an entirely different matter. If you decided to explore this line of reasoning, let us know what you find out.

Isn't this where govt. building inspectors should be held responsible?.

 
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05-17-09, 09:59 AM   #10 (permalink)  
Although the bldg. could be settling so bad that it's actually pushing the side rail down that is very unlikely.It is much more likely to sag in the middle as this sides are double studded and the middle of window is only supported by w/e header they have.These flange style aluminum windows are not as likely (as other styles of installation) to sag on the sides,I'm not saying it's impossible,but before it pushed the frame that far down on the sides, it will actually crack drywall etc., so this kind of issue is usually very apparent.Of course the diagonal measurements are the quickest way to determine if squareness is actually the problem.From the size of the gap I really don't think this 1 is a squareness issue.

 
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