Build Casement Windows

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-14-09, 11:55 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kemp, TX
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Build Casement Windows

I was looking a some casement windows.

Our house will have over 20 windows. Most of the nice windows I have seen range between $500 and $700 each.

Casement windows don't look that complicated to me. The construction of them, I mean. I was considering the idea of building the windows myself.

They would not have the crank handles (since I don't like them anyway). I would prefer they have a simple opening mechanism. Just a couple of locking levers and a swing arm.

The woodworking doesn't concern me, really. Where I think I will have problems is with the glass and seals. I don't know where to buy double-pane, gas-sealed glass. I also don't know if the gas-sealed is even important. I can just do a double-pane.

Any thoughts on this ambitious task?
 
  #2  
Old 05-14-09, 04:49 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Wilmington
Posts: 4,214
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I don't know what your shop or skills are like, but those manufacturers have considerably more of all the above than you have. You will never be able to duplicate a quality Andersen window at their price. And can your guarantee the windows for 20 yrs against seal glass/seal failure and 10 yrs for other problems??????????
 
  #3  
Old 05-14-09, 06:11 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: KC
Posts: 77
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Assuming you have the skill, the tools and the time, I think you should be commended for even considering such an undertaking, Do what all manufacturers do, borrow design ideas from existing products.

Insulated glass can be found in most major cities. Check around, afterall there is a lot of repairs and glass replacement going on. As for hardware, try Blaine Window Hardware (on the web). They will have every type of latch and RGS vinyl seal and screen extrusion you could possibly want to seal your windows properly another alternative would be OUtwater Plastics.

Time will be your only real enemy. My sense is by the time you
finish making those 20 windows you probably could have bought them a lot cheaper. You don't have to buy windows at a lumber yard or big box store. You can find them at wholesalers in almost any market. In these times where the building industry is all but stopped, many wholesalers will gladly sell you especially for cash. Don't be bashful, ask them for their best price. Then ask if they can do a little better if you pay cash. Uou'll be suprised at the results.
 
  #4  
Old 05-14-09, 07:12 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 10,524
Received 37 Votes on 34 Posts
I had the opportunity to do an energy audit on a post and beam framed home where they were trying to make everything they could. Well, the carpenter made their double hung windows. Now I don't know how they performed when first built, but 10 years later they were about as good as a screen door. Yes they were single pane, but the wood had shrunk everywhere and any wind would whistle through the house. The windows alone were 50% of her heat loss. In the 10 years she had those windows, it probably cost her $10,000 in extra heating costs, and that was when energy was a lot less expensive. They have now been replaced and she is very happy with the new windows.

This would take a cabinet level carpenter, high end tools, and some materials not typically found at home depot.

Good Luck,
Bud
 
  #5  
Old 05-14-09, 07:45 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: KC
Posts: 77
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Double hung windows never perform as well as casements no matter who makes them, so I'm not suprised by the results of your energy audit. Good quality kiln dried lumber is available in most major cities so there should be no reason to go to HD or Lowes for what they consider to be lumber. Frankly I'm not sure I would go to a local lumber yard either, but thats just me. And the components needed to seal the sashes properly are readily available from suppliers already named.

My advice is to plan, design and make a prototype (one of the smaller windows). If nothing else it will be an adventure.
By the time you go through all of the steps, and see the end results, you can determine for yourself if you should continue.
 
  #6  
Old 05-15-09, 07:09 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kemp, TX
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wow. Thanks for all the replies!

I had another thought. Instead of wood, how about composite decking material? To my knowledge, it does dot shrink, warp or bend very easily. Granted, there would be considerable work in "creating" the shapes for the window since decking material is all 2 x 4. But these windows will be painted white on the outside and inside (not natural wood finish).

Another reason I am considering making the windows is the architectural shapes. We are creating a Gothic Revival home with very specific window shapes and styles. Most of the windows will be french casement and will be exactly the same size. There are three major windows that cannot possibly be purchased. The have three panes of glass, are skinny, tall and have three triangles at the top. There are also door-sized windows on the back.

I am fairly certain the total bill for purchasing these windows could easily be more than 30,000.

It is a lot of work to create these windows. But, the good thing is, I can create them as I go. I am in a rural area that has absolutely no code restrictions (I talked to the county, the fire marshall, the nearest city, public works and the county precinct.) There is an inspection required (by the nearest city) for plumbing and electrical, but no permits are required.
 
  #7  
Old 05-15-09, 09:04 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: KC
Posts: 77
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Before you consider the composit material cut one and see the inside. Composit material are not consistent in density inside and out or even throughout.
 
  #8  
Old 05-15-09, 09:37 AM
S
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Kemp, TX
Posts: 34
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hum, hadn't thought of that. Any ideas for a durable material anyone? Is cedar the best choice if I go with wood?

Here's a crazy thought; how about using cedar and then having a powder coating applied (by the same people that do truck bedliners.) -- just thinking outside the box. With so much effort, I want whatever I do to last.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: