Window Help

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Old 11-22-09, 07:21 AM
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Window Help

I am in need of new windows and I would like to do them myself.. My question is do I install replacements windows, or replace the entire window, frame and all. The exterior of the window is cased in wood molding which is soliod but paint peels and chips easily. I have painted them already but the elemts take there toll. I am wondering how the new window will work without the existing molding on the exterior - meaning can I relace the window and remove the existing molding? If i just do a replacment window, what do I do with the storm screens and windows that are screwed in from the outside? they are in need to replacing as well. and If I do replacment windows how to fix the wood mold on the exterior? Need help.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 07:39 AM
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If you choose replacement windows, the frame remains in place as does all your exterior moldings. You just order the replacements the size of your existing sashes. Simple to do. Takes probably 30 minutes per window. If you choose to replace the entire window, you will have to deal with exterior siding issues. If you have storm windows, you can get a $1 for them at a garage sale, as you won't need them with today's modern insulated glass units. How is your house sided now? Could you post a couple of pictures of the exterior (not macro) on a site such as photobucket.com and copy/paste the IMG code to your reply post so we can see what you have?
 
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Old 11-22-09, 07:44 AM
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Replacing window can be a do-it-yourself project. Just do some homework before you start. Start by making sure you have the most energy efficient window. No sense in replacing them if you don't.

I would recommend replacing the complete window, frame and all. The only way to cover the old brickmoulding outside is with a metal bending brake. If you don't have one of those, you will still be painting the exterior for years to come. Once moisture gets into the wood it's really tough to keep paint on them.

You will remove the complete window, trims and all. set the new windows. Make sure you install them correctly and properly flash them. You don't want a window that leaks.

If you need to fill the space between the new window and siding, most manufactures make a vynl trim that can be applied outside. Just cut it to fit the space.

Any other questions just let me know. Be glad to help.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 07:57 AM
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Replacing the entire window is much more work and very intrusive. You will have to remove and replace all the moldings inside and out and the siding.

If the old frame is in good shape and square, then inserts will work well. If you go that route, make sure you insulate the old weight pockets if you have them, and use quality caulk.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:02 AM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
Replacing the entire window is much more work and very intrusive. You will have to remove and replace all the moldings inside and out and the siding.

If the old frame is in good shape and square, then inserts will work well. If you go that route, make sure you insulate the old weight pockets if you have them, and use quality caulk.
I agree, replacement windows are simpler. Simpler and faster isn't always better. Your still relying on the old installations flashings and insulation job. I have done this both ways and still like a complete window install.

Drooplug, good tip on insulating the weight pockets. That often times gets overlooked.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 08:39 AM
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my house was built in 1977, and window frames sems to be in good shape. However - I did have one window replaced a year ago as the sill was rotted. The guy inslatted a new window, but did not replace the brick molding on the outside - he wrapped it. If I go the replacement route, does that also replace the sill as well? I dont want to rip out the entire frame if I dont have to - but want to make sure I do it right. If I go the replacement route - do i simply unscrew the storm windows and just remove and out nothing back in its place?

My house is alum sided

I will try to post some pictures.. Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 04:11 PM
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No the replacement won't have a new sill... other the the one on the window itself. You would need to wrap that with aluminum also. Wrapping brickmolding and trim with aluminum is time consuming in itself. That's why I recommend the whole new window. Your still leaving part of the old window.

If you do go replacement you won't need old storms and screens. Your right, just remove them.

When you install replacement windows your new window will be made slightly smaller than the opening you have left after removing the old sashes etc.. This leaves little room for adjustment if the old window isn't level, plumb and square.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 04:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Door Guy View Post
I agree, replacement windows are simpler. Simpler and faster isn't always better. Your still relying on the old installations flashings and insulation job. I have done this both ways and still like a complete window install.

Drooplug, good tip on insulating the weight pockets. That often times gets overlooked.
I recommended the insert replacement because he was looking to do it himself and it seemed it may be a bit more than he was looking to get involved with. I agree that a full replacement is the best way.

I recently had all my windows replaced with inserts. I went that route because I didn't want the mouldings on the interior disturbed or the 80 year old cedar shingles on the outside disturbed.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 05:37 PM
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thanks for all the good advice.. if i do the entire window frame etc.. how much of the alum siding will either be disturbed or need to be replaced? Not sure I can find the same siding if I need to replace anything.. I have never done a window before but Iam pretty handy but looking for the best option.. price, time, and value.. If I do replacement - is there a way to cover teh existing brick mould withiut a bending machine? is there a kit or something that I can use?
 
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Old 11-22-09, 06:53 PM
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Usually you won't need to disturb any siding. In fact you will need to add trim back around the window as the new window won't have brickmoulding or trim applied. You have a couple options there. You can buy flat vinyl or vinyl wrapped trim to take up the space. They also make a PVC brickmoulding you could add.

You see, the outside unit dimension will be close to the size of the rough opening. That's why you will have the extra space.

There is also an aluminum brickmoulding cover that will slide over the trim. Problem there is you still have the sill and some of the window not covered.
 
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Old 11-22-09, 06:57 PM
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Originally Posted by drooplug View Post
I recommended the insert replacement because he was looking to do it himself and it seemed it may be a bit more than he was looking to get involved with. I agree that a full replacement is the best way.

I recently had all my windows replaced with inserts. I went that route because I didn't want the mouldings on the interior disturbed or the 80 year old cedar shingles on the outside disturbed.
That's exactly why they make them! I totally agree with you on that. Every situation needs to be weighed out first.
 
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Old 11-23-09, 05:19 PM
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Thanks for all of your help guys. Very informative and much appreciated. Think ill try one window to see hos difficult it is. I live in CT, so its starting to get cold, not sure I want to get into having a hole in the house when the weather is unpredictable. I may be back for more advice
 
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Old 11-30-09, 02:50 PM
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I'm in the middle of replacing 17 windows in my house...all custom at that. I would recommend getting vinyl replacement windows. If the wood frame is in good shape...keep it. Try scraping, sanding, and filling the wood frame the best you can. Then take some exterior primer and prime the wood frame after you take out the old window. Insulate real well in any gaps if you have old windows with weights in the walls. Purchase some energy effecient, triple pane vinyle replacement windows. Shoot some "Great Stuff" in the gaps and caulk really well. Hope this helps.
 
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