Moisture on inside of windows


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Old 02-15-10, 10:03 AM
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Unhappy Moisture on inside of windows

I remolded my home last summer,and now it's winter. I calked all Light Switches, Plumbing inlets, Windows, and Doors I also put new seals around all of my doors, I made my house as air tight as I could. But now I have a new problem my windows frost up on the inside and I don't know why my neighbor said that I got the house to air tight. I will be changing the windows to duel pain when I can afford to, now they are old single pain, And the windows on the north side of my house fog up all the way the rest of them about 1/4 of the way from the bottom up. Please give me some help with this, They are also getting mold around the bottom. Thanks for any help.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 10:28 AM
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Single pane windows provide almost no significant insulation against heat loss. If it is 70F inside, and 0F outside, single pane glass will be about 16F. Windows with double pane glass will be more effective at reducing heat loss (raising the center-of-glass temp to around 45-50F under the same conditions), but even they will sweat if the humidity in a home is too high, the temperatures outside are very cold, or both. As long as the temperature of the glass stays above the dewpoint, your windows will not sweat. By caulking areas that formerly were leaky, you have trapped humid air in the house and reduce the amount of fresh air that used to help keep your humidity down. Your dewpoint has likely gone up, causing your windows to sweat even though it may not be any colder out than other years.

So your problem is excessive humidity, likely cause by poor air exchange. You should reduce humidity and increase air flow. You can do this by running bath fans constantly, by running forced air furnace fans constantly, increasing the movement of air. Some recommend opening a window to allow fresh (dryer) air in, but in the winter that's usually hard to do.

You could also contact an HVAC technician and see if your furnace could be upgraded to have better exchange- to introduce more fresh air, and exhaust your humid conditioned air. He could also make sure you don't have a combustion problem with your furnace which could also add humidity (and/or carbon monoxide) to the air, or check for a blocked dryer vent or bath fan duct.

Grab a bottle of Tilex bathroom cleaner and keep any surface mold cleaned up so that it doesn't get out of control.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 10:30 AM
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You need more ventilation. Open a window an inch or so and turn on a bath fan for a day or two.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 11:22 AM
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Question Mosture on windows.

Originally Posted by airman.1994
You need more ventilation. Open a window an inch or so and turn on a bath fan for a day or two.
I thought makeing your house air tight was a good thing, Now you say I need to open a window or leave the fan on in the bathroom for a day or two. After I turn off the fan off and close the door I will have the same thing the next morniong. How about getting a Dehunidafire, would that work, or should I just reverse all the calking I did.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 11:28 AM
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Question

Originally Posted by XSleeper
Single pane windows provide almost no significant insulation against heat loss. If it is 70F inside, and 0F outside, single pane glass will be about 16F. Windows with double pane glass will be more effective at reducing heat loss (raising the center-of-glass temp to around 45-50F under the same conditions), but even they will sweat if the humidity in a home is too high, the temperatures outside are very cold, or both. As long as the temperature of the glass stays above the dewpoint, your windows will not sweat. By caulking areas that formerly were leaky, you have trapped humid air in the house and reduce the amount of fresh air that used to help keep your humidity down. Your dewpoint has likely gone up, causing your windows to sweat even though it may not be any colder out than other years.

So your problem is excessive humidity, likely cause by poor air exchange. You should reduce humidity and increase air flow. You can do this by running bath fans constantly, by running forced air furnace fans constantly, increasing the movement of air. Some recommend opening a window to allow fresh (dryer) air in, but in the winter that's usually hard to do.

You could also contact an HVAC technician and see if your furnace could be upgraded to have better exchange- to introduce more fresh air, and exhaust your humid conditioned air. He could also make sure you don't have a combustion problem with your furnace which could also add humidity (and/or carbon monoxide) to the air, or check for a blocked dryer vent or bath fan duct.

Grab a bottle of Tilex bathroom cleaner and keep any surface mold cleaned up so that it doesn't get out of control.
I will see what I can do , It sounds like I made things worse by trying to make my house air tight so as not to use to much utillaties to warm my house. How about putting a Dehumidafier in one room,Would that work.?
 
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Old 02-15-10, 12:43 PM
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In fact there are companies that make air exchangers to alleviate the stale, humid air problems of a too tight house.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 01:33 PM
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Don't know your weather but dehumidifiers or not the solution in heating season. Ventilation is. Most homes need around 80 CFM of fresh air for good IAQ.
 
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Old 02-15-10, 01:57 PM
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To further answer your question, no, sealing up a house is not a good thing in reality. Once we started sealing up our homes, we had to invent a way to get combustible air to fireplaces, furnaces and the like because they were using up your breathable air too fast. You are seeing the other end of the lesser breathable air thing in your situation.
Air exchangers or ventilation is the only way to keep your house from doing things it shouldn't like sweating and molding due to lack of fresh air.
 
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Old 02-17-10, 11:24 AM
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Smile Thanks

I want to think all of you for your help, I took the cover I made for my whole house fan off and the cap I put on top of my chemney for the fireplace and things are much better now, No more Moisture on my windows. Next I will be putting a fan in my bathroon there never was one.
 
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Old 02-20-10, 09:05 AM
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I noticed the same thing after I replace a couple windows.

My newly installed ceiling fan does wonders.
Hardly no problem at all. Even with the humidifier running. Before, we hardly
ever had condensation. Except when we ran the dishwasher.
Also, I was told (some) humidity is good for your health AND for your house.
 
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Old 02-20-10, 12:57 PM
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Moisture on windows

Thanks for that but I had way to much moisture on my windows from the top all the way to the bottom, But now that I removed the cap I put on my chimney and took the cover off of my whole house fan all is fine now. Thanks.
 
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Old 02-22-10, 03:50 PM
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Unhappy Still have Moisture

I thought aftert removing the cap off of my chimnney and the cover off of my whole house fan that things would be better and it was for two days then it turned cold and the next morning all the windows in the house had moisture all the way from the top to the bottom. I am at a lose, I checked all of my water fittings in the house for small leakes and didn'y find any. Is there some thing I am over looking this all happened after I calked all my windows and doors this should not of caused it. But I didn't have any trouble before I did it, I really need some help I am getting mold at the bottom of the windows. HELP
 
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Old 02-22-10, 04:02 PM
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If you have a digital camera, a picture of the windows might help. You upload them to a site like photobucket, then copy and paste the link to the picture in your reply.

I'd also like to hear more about exactly where you caulked your windows. Inside? Outside? Around the trim, or what? Some windows have a storm window that has holes that need to breathe, and caulking them shut can cause fogging. But I'm just grasping for straws.
 
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Old 02-25-10, 10:59 AM
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Thumbs up Wet Widows

I think the trouble I am having is the new blinds, We close them at night and in the morning when we open them we have moisture, So for the last few nights we have been leaving them open and there is no moisture in the morning.So I guess if we just dont close them all the way at night things are fine. Thanks for all of the help I have goten on this site.
 
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Old 02-25-10, 12:02 PM
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If you have a clothes dryer, make sure that it is properly vented. I had a dryer in my basement that was not vented, and it caused problems throughout the house. A bathroom fan (I would use a timer switch to keep it running for a while after a shower) will help as well. What type of heat do you have? I have seen defective air vents on single pipe steam heat act as humidifiers if they are not functioning properly.
 
 

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