Interior window sill rot


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Old 02-24-10, 11:16 PM
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Interior window sill rot

My 55 year old home has a bathroom with a single pane aluminum window. I've had issues with mold accumulating on the caulk between my interior sill and the window for a while now, but always assumed it was from condensation from the shower.

Tonight while attempting to strip out the caulk, I actually broke through part of the sill. Probing around with my screw driver, I was able break apart a good sized chunk. The wood felt wet to the touch.

I went outside and found a possible intrusion point in my stucco, but am unsure if that is the culprit.

Any ideas of what could be the source of the moisture (coming from the outside? Condensation from the outside?) would be great. I'd also like some advice on where to proceed from here.

I've attached some photos for reference. Thanks in advice for the help!


The portion of the sill that is rotted, I was able to dig through the entire depth of the board.


The sill and an adjacent wall. The paint on that wall started to blister. When I tried to remove the paint part of the drywall came with it.


View from the outside. I'm wondering if the cracked stucco around the window could be the culprit.
 
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Old 02-25-10, 01:10 AM
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The crack around the window frame can be sealed with an elastomeric sealant, but it seems the glazing around the window is failing and could stand replacing. It isn't stucco, but may be a concrete product, depending on when it was installed. Modern glazing compounds will give a better seal and are paintable without the cracking effect if properly applied and primed. Once you stop the water infiltration, then you can replace the sill nosing.
 
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Old 02-25-10, 10:53 PM
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Thanks for the advice. One more question. As you can see in the photo below, I've removed a bit more crumbly material from the sill and adjoining wall. It looks like the sill should be replaced completely. What about the drywall next to it? Should I continue to remove anything that is soft/wet/crumbly? I'm concerned about getting carried away with my demo.



Thanks.
 
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Old 02-26-10, 04:44 AM
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One problem with not "carrying the demo too far" is not carrying it far enough. You appear to have paint blister above the area in question, and this indicates a moisture problem. The sheetrock on the jamb is easy enough to replace and repair. I would probably cut it about 8" or so up and replace/repair the piece. The sill nosing is pretty straight forward and they can be found at most better lumber yards to match your existing.
 
 

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