New Window in Existing Wall


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Old 08-09-10, 10:21 AM
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New Window in Existing Wall

First post, anxious to get some input. I'm remodeling a bathroom and am wanting to install a new window in a existing wall. I've looked around online and have more or less found the proper procedure for framing the window etc. , but haven't found a complete procedure to follow. Basically, the exterior of the house is covered with wood shingles (or slats, not sure of proper terminology) and I'm wanting to make sure I know the proper way to cut the hole to make sure the exterior is finished properly. I have basic/intermediate carpentry skills and this is my first project where I'm cutting through a exterior wall. If anyone can provide a quick how-to or a link that shows the entire process I would really appreciate it. I feel comfortable with the framing but am still in the grey with the hole cutting process and the post-installation trim, so any help is appreciated.
 
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Old 08-09-10, 02:24 PM
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I see alot of lookers but no talkers, what's up with that? haha Anyways, any pointers at all will be better than nothing... Thanks..
 
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Old 08-09-10, 02:35 PM
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Most of the Pro's are probably working....give it time.

Type/age of home would be good. Interior surface? Plaster or sheetrock?

I don't feel qualified to tell you much more. I've turned windows into doors, and vice-versa..but never what you desire.
 
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Old 08-09-10, 02:47 PM
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I would try to position it so you only need to cut out one stud. I would draw out exactly where I want it on the inside then start knocking a few small easily repairable holes in the Sheetrock so I could check for pipes and cables. When I was sure the space would work I would cut out the Sheetrock.

From the inside using a " 12" long drill bit I would drill holes in the out side wall at each corner. This would tell me where the window will be.

How you proceed from there depends on how your doors and windows are trimmed out. Do the shakes butt against the trim or is it on top of the trim.

Most important thing is every job is different so be prepared to modify the techniques to work with what you really have.
 
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Old 08-09-10, 03:05 PM
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The wall I'm placing the window in is relatively small. Roughly 37.75" wide by 93" tall. I've already completely removed the drywall from the interior wall. I have two existing studs that will need to be "relocated" due to the window. I understand the placement of the king studs, jack studs, cripple studs and header. So I feel like I've got the interior framing under control. My question is really more on the cutting through the wall so I don't damage the exterior shingling. I had planned on framing the window and then simply cutting the hole out from the inside with a Sawzall. Seems to me that should work, but I'm sure there something I need to be watching out for..

The house was built in 79' and the exterior seems to be a layer of I assume sheet insulation (reflective material facing the interior), the actual wall plywood then the wooden "shingles" on the exterior.
 
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Old 08-09-10, 03:38 PM
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Ray covered it.... Be certain the short wall is not required to remain sheathed to keep the roof/house from racking there (shear flow). Example would be a 12' wall offset from the main house wall, with short walls abutting out between them on each end. (A bump-out wall)

An exterior picture would solve it.....

Be safe, Gary
 
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Old 08-09-10, 03:41 PM
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Originally Posted by flipt View Post
I had planned on framing the window and then simply cutting the hole out from the inside with a Sawzall. Seems to me that should work, but I'm sure there something I need to be watching out for...
That's exactly how you should do it. If you reciprocate from the inside (using a 9" reciprocating blade) the saw teeth will pull the shingles tight to the house as you saw, and it shouldn't shake any of them loose. Having someone on the outside to hold their hand against the shingles as you cut wouldn't be a bad idea, just to prevent them from accidentally shaking loose as you cut.

Once you've cut out the rough opening, you will still need to cut more off the shingles, but you will do that with a skilsaw. Assuming your window has a nailing flange, and that you will be installing 2" brickmould around the window after it is installed, you will measure the window- lets say it's 24"x48", add about 4 1/4" to each measurement (28 1/4" x 52 1/4") and cut that out with a skilsaw, making sure your pencil lines are perfectly plumb... parallel, and that the entire opening you have marked out is square (measure the diagonals- they should be equal).

When you cut the shingle siding out, nail a 1x4 on the house to give you a flat surface to run the skilsaw on. Move the 1x4 for each cut. Nail on the inside of your line, not the outside. The 1x4 will help you cut at a consistent depth, not cutting too deep into the sheathing. If you don't use the 1x4 to slide the saw on, your saw will have to jump over each shingle lap, meaning you are cutting too deep in some areas, and maybe not deep enough in others.

Once you've removed the siding around the rough opening, you should apply housewrap around the opening, incorporating it into any existing felt. Tuck it behind the siding as best as you can.

Install the window, centering it on your plumb, level and square cutout that you made in the siding. Then seal the perimeter of the nailing flange with window flashing tape, such as the stuff that Pella sells (little 3" wide rolls of peel and stick foil window tape). You'd want to put a drip cap behind your siding on top, then install your brickmould trim under that, top piece first, sides second, bottom third. Then caulk the window to the trim, and the trim to the siding.

Unless I'm forgetting something that's about it. If I am, I'm sure someone will chime in. LOL
 
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Old 08-09-10, 03:57 PM
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I would cut the sheathing from the out side with a circular saw and then finish the stud(s) with a Sawzall but that is just me.
 
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Old 08-11-10, 04:16 PM
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Thanks for al the input. New question, same project. In this scenario is it smarter to go with a new construction window vs a replacement window? They seem to be the same window minus the nailing fin and it seems that would make it unnecessary to cut the perimeter of the opening on the exterior wall to accomodate the nailing fin. I 've went to the Depot two evenings in a row looking for a window and the only one that seems to be a "good" size for the area is a replacement...

Also, regarding the size, I basically have 37.75" width and 8' tall minus the height of a standard toilet (anyone now how tall that is? haha). Are there any "rules" to follow when choosing a proper window size?
 
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Old 08-11-10, 04:32 PM
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Yes it is smarter to go with a new construction window that has a nailing fin.

As far as the size goes, you will likely want to keep the header height exactly the same as the other windows on the same wall. Sometimes it's imperative that the interior trim line up for aesthetic purposes. As far as the total length and width, that's up to your preference. Don't make the window so wide that the casing is mashed into a corner.
 
 

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