interior door alignment - help!

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Old 08-20-10, 08:47 AM
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interior door alignment - help!

The "carpenter" installed a new door into an existing frame (which may not be square) - he mortised for the 3 hinges, on the door, by hand (no jig). The door strikes the stop at the bottom on the latch side but is out from the stop at the top (latch side).
I assume that the door hinges need adjustment/relocation?
Any help would be appreciated ...
thnx
 
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Old 08-20-10, 10:13 AM
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Door Alignment

Are the hinges spaced the same from the door stop? If so, the problem is an out of line jamb(s). Check both the left and right side jambs for plumb.

The door strikes the stop at the bottom on the latch side but is out from the stop at the top (latch side).
How much difference do you have?
 
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Old 08-20-10, 12:07 PM
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You paid a carpenter to do this, make him come back out and get it right
 
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Old 08-20-10, 01:19 PM
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Well....he did say "carpenter".....I'm guessing it was someone who owned a hammer, saw, and pickup truck.

I'm still not sure if we are talking about not contacting the stop (like a warped door) or too far in the opening so it can't reach the stop (racked frame kinda thing).

http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html
 
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Old 08-20-10, 01:37 PM
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Well, whether it's "carpenter" or carpenter, if the job was hired out, as this sounds, the one paid to do the work should get it right

My opinion, obviously
 
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Old 08-20-10, 02:15 PM
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I agree Mitch...but it sounds like there wasn't a lot of workmanship involved. Not sure I'd want that person back. Even I (a mid-level DIY guy) have hinge guides (or whatever they're called) for both hand morticing and for a router.
 
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Old 08-20-10, 02:46 PM
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I agree - it sounds like I have more experience hanging doors than this "carpenter" and I don't even own a pickup truck
 
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Old 08-20-10, 03:19 PM
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Ok, well I own a pickup, a hammer, and a saw (albeit a hacksaw) and .....a van!
I hereby deem myself qualified to offer a possibility according to the preset qualifications.

If the top hinge was not mortised flush, the hinge may be 'tipped' back at the knuckles pulling the door back.
Just had to say something because I'm qualified

How does the line look between the hinge jamb and the door?
 
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Old 08-20-10, 05:23 PM
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Door

It sounds to me like the owner is going to have to tell the "carpenter" how to fix the problem; otherwise the "carpenter" may make a bad situation even worse. Some photos of the problem would help us better understand the situation.
 
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Old 08-20-10, 09:29 PM
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It's interesting how all of you can deduce that the carpenter is to blame for this problem based on a pair of "quotation marks".

Originally Posted by bobcanuck View Post
The "carpenter" installed a new door into an existing frame (which may not be square)
The problem may not be with the "carpenter", but with a preexisting condition that you now want him to correct.

Either your "existing frame", your "door stop" - or both- are probably not plumb. (square is not the correct term) If the door stop on the hinge side fits nicely against the door, then there is no problem with the way the hinges are mortised. If this is an interior door, the door stop is probably removable, and can be repositioned.

So that is one solution. Remove the door stop, close the door so that it latches, reinstall the door stop (not tight, just moderate contact) against the door while it is in the closed position.

Moving the bottom hinge away from the door stop and the top hinge toward the door stop would bring the top latch side toward the door stop. (but it would also change the way the door meets the hinge side door stop!) So you would be fixing one problem, but causing another.

The bottom line usually is, how plumb does the door appear when it is closing or closed. When you go to shut the door, and the latch almost contacts the strike plate, you should be able to observe the gap up and down the latch side of the door. If it is consistantly straight, the legs of the door are aligned in the same plane, and its possible that your door stop was installed out of plumb to match the door that USED to be on there. If the gap isn't straight when you begin to close the door, the legs of the jamb are likely twisted.

This assumes your carpenter mortised each of the hinges with exactly the same backset. If he used different backsets you would be able to tell by measuring the distance from the edge of the hinge to the edge of the door closest to the door stop. (should be 5/16" or so, for example.)

Another possibility? The new slab is warped.
 
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Old 08-21-10, 05:08 AM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
It's interesting how all of you can deduce that the carpenter is to blame for this problem based on a pair of "quotation marks".
XSleeper,

Just a little fun, thats all.

Main point here IMO is that the door should not have been left in that condition.
If it was a pre-existing 'round peg in a square hole' condition, it should have been explained (in detail) before he/she walked away so as not to leave the OP blaming poor workmanship.
 
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Old 08-22-10, 12:54 PM
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I would like to thank everyone who took the time to comment/advise ... I'll "go at it" again tomorrow, taking into consideration your thoughts.
Once again, thanks

Bob
 
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Old 08-22-10, 02:09 PM
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Originally Posted by XSleeper View Post
Moving the bottom hinge away from the door stop and the top hinge toward the door stop would bring the top latch side toward the door stop. (but it would also change the way the door meets the hinge side door stop!) So you would be fixing one problem, but causing another.
I have to apologize, I think I reversed the directions...

To bring the latch side in line you would move the top hinge away from the door stop, and the bottom hinge toward the door stop.

However, I'm not convinced thats your best solution, if doing that makes the door stick out crooked on the hinge side. All that would do is move the problem to a different location.

Good luck!
 
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Old 08-22-10, 02:34 PM
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Carpenter

XSleeper,

I apologize if I offended you or anyone else, especially those who are good at what they do and take pride in their work.

I read the OP to mean that the work done was not adequate. If I am wrong, I am truly sorry.
 
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Old 08-22-10, 02:54 PM
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No worries, I didn't take offense to anything, just thought it was funny (strange) how almost all the comments were directed toward the carpenter, whose skills none of us are privy to.

There are probably reasons the door turned out the way it did. I guess I was thinking that it's hard to pass judgment based on such little detail!

Oldblades certainly has a valid point that the door probably should not have been left in that condition without some sort of communication as to why it was so.

And what Mitch says about getting it right is true, but on the other hand, you get what you pay for. So if this was some fly-by-night "carpenter" well, then its understandable that the quality of the work might suffer. That's always a possibility!
 
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