Glazing material


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Old 11-10-10, 03:51 AM
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Glazing material

Getting bids from house painters.

One uses 'standard' window glazing compound to repair broken/missing material (he says it will take a month to dry, which is what I've heard before, the other uses a material that is "ready to sand in 1 day". Is the second guy for real?
 
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Old 11-10-10, 04:29 AM
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Why would the glazing need to be sanded?

I've always removed the loose glazing, prime the wood, glaze, prime again after 24 hrs and then paint.

While it probably takes a month or so for glazing to dry out, I've never seen the need to wait that long [most jobs need to be done quicker than that anyway] Glazing should be applied neatly and not need any sanding.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 04:17 AM
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Having been in the glass business for over 40 years I would use Dap Glazing Compound which, as marksr said, is ready to paint in a day. It really never dries to a hard finish like the "putty" from years ago did.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 10:49 AM
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How well/workable is the Dap in cold weather? - Ive used a glazing compound in the summer months..but not winter time.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 01:32 PM
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It helps to store the can in the truck how cold do you expect it to be when glazing a window? sometimes it's better to wait for a warmer day.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 01:42 PM
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Just to clarify....is the painter talking about around the glass on windows..or things like knots and such in wood?

The ready to sand statement is what caught my eye.....you don't sand window glazing, as mark said.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 02:06 PM
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Good point Vic! if the glazing is being used to repair damaged or defective siding - there are better products to use than glazing.
 
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Old 11-11-10, 03:02 PM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
It helps to store the can in the truck how cold do you expect it to be when glazing a window? sometimes it's better to wait for a warmer day.
We're in the 40's F here now.. and my client's windows could use it.. I was considering re-glazing the exterior..and caulking the interior..!?!?
What do you think?
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and.. re: marksr .."Good point Vic! if the glazing is being used to repair damaged or defective siding - there are better products to use than glazing."
.
So true... but Jon, the OP, does say 'window glazing' compound..
 
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Old 11-11-10, 06:38 PM
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Thanks for all the input, folks.

Last time I used DAP 33 I waited for 3 days. Of course that was warm weather. Trying to paint befiore the glazing 'skins' over and your brush will distort or scratch the fresh glazing compound.

BTW, what IS the best repair material for wood knots and toher such defects?
 
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Old 11-12-10, 03:18 AM
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Jon, how oily was the Dap 33 you used? I've never had any issues with painting any glazing after 24 hrs. I prefer to use SWP's 66 glazing because it isn't as oily so it keeps my hands cleaner

I don't do a lot of siding repair but glazing is ok for minor voids, I have also used caulking. Durham's Rock Hard Putty works well but it must be applied neatly as it's almost impossible to sand. There are also a lot of epoxy type fillers available.


jatco, a lot depends on how bad the windows need reglazing now. It would be best to wait for warmer weather but if it needs to be done now, it can be. The glazing compound should be warm. If I know I'm going to have to use it during cold weather I'll set it on the dash and let the defroster warm the can up on the way to the job. You could also bring the glazing inside the night before.

If the job is optional, it's best to wait for warmer weather. Glazing in cold weather will do ok but since you probably can't paint it for awhile it won't last as long it would otherwise.
 
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Old 11-13-10, 09:48 AM
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Originally Posted by marksr View Post
.....
jatco, a lot depends on how bad the windows need reglazing now. It would be best to wait for warmer weather but if it needs to be done now, it can be. The glazing compound should be warm. If I know I'm going to have to use it during cold weather I'll set it on the dash and let the defroster warm the can up on the way to the job. You could also bring the glazing inside the night before.

If the job is optional, it's best to wait for warmer weather. Glazing in cold weather will do ok but since you probably can't paint it for awhile it won't last as long it would otherwise.
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Yeah, Mark ..I hear ya. In this application the glass is leaded glass ..and at the top, you can see light coming thru in some areas. Perhaps some interior caulking (or glazing) to hold them over for the winter..and proper glazing in the spring..?!?!
We'll see how it goes...!
 
 

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