High thresholds -- how to transition???


  #1  
Old 02-22-11, 07:42 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 178
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
High thresholds -- how to transition???

I have an entry door that has a 1 1/4" high threshold and a sliding glass door with a threshold that is 2" high (man, that's high). I need a transition or something to, at the very least, make them not so noticeable. Both thresholds are squared and abrupt (meaning they're 90* angles to the floor and not ramped).

I should note that the floors are hardwood. The exterior threshold height on both doors is about 1/2", so the problem is the interior. I need these thresholds to be up to code and pass inspection.

Anyone have any ideas?
 

Last edited by beekrock; 02-22-11 at 08:19 PM.
  #2  
Old 02-23-11, 04:00 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Can you post some pix? Not close ups, we know what flooring looks like. That way we can see what you see. Different angles would be best. When were the thresholds installed? Prior to flooring or after? http://forum.doityourself.com/electr...your-post.html
 
  #3  
Old 02-23-11, 07:32 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 178
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
I'll snap some pics today. The doors and thresholds were put in after the flooring.
 
  #4  
Old 02-23-11, 06:57 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,226
Received 1,715 Upvotes on 1,539 Posts
About all you can do is make a threshold out of wood that steps up from the floor slightly (narrow end 1/4" with a slight roundover is pretty standard) up to the height you want (1/4" below the top of the threshold you're trying to meet looks best). Pick a width that won't look too bulky and cut the angle desired. Can all be done on a table saw, you'll need to sand the cut edges.

It's often best for the door casing to sit on top of this piece rather than try to notch around the casing.

Don't try to make ramps right up to the top of the threshold, that's pointless unless you are rolling someone out the door in a wheelchair. IMO a threshold should take away about half the rise, not all of it. The steeper you make the angle, the wider the threshold will need to be. In other words, a 45 degree wedge really isn't much of an improvement. But a 2" wide piece at a 20 degree angle might make it seem a bit more tolerable.

Keep in mind that the more dense hardwoods work best for thresholds that get foot traffic- woods like oak, hickory, walnut, beech, etc.
 
  #5  
Old 02-23-11, 07:21 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 178
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Here are some pics of the thresholds in question:




XSleeper- Great advice. Thanks!
 
  #6  
Old 02-23-11, 07:32 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,226
Received 1,715 Upvotes on 1,539 Posts
Most big box stores and hardware stores will have a small selection of oak thresholds that you could choose from. If they are too wide you could rip them down to size.

You'd want to cut the length so that it reaches to the baseboard on each side. And goes under the casing (door trim). You'd bob the ends of the threshold back at a 45, so that the bobbed end of the threshold meets the front of the baseshoe at an angle. That way your threshold can be several inches wide, but will return back to the baseboard neatly.
 
  #7  
Old 02-23-11, 07:55 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 178
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
About all you can do is make a threshold out of wood that steps up from the floor slightly (narrow end 1/4" with a slight roundover is pretty standard) up to the height you want (1/4" below the top of the threshold you're trying to meet looks best).
Hey, Sleeper. Is this what you meant when you said this? I'm just trying to get a visual.

 
  #8  
Old 02-24-11, 04:08 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,226
Received 1,715 Upvotes on 1,539 Posts
Close... it would have a flat spot before it gets to the door threshold. This would give the door trim something flat to sit on. It should probably extend 1/4" beyond the face of the trim- flat, before it pitches downward.
 
  #9  
Old 02-24-11, 07:36 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 178
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Awesome, Sleeper. Thanks again!
 
  #10  
Old 02-24-11, 12:36 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
One question.....why were the doors put in "after" the flooring? Just curious.
 
  #11  
Old 02-24-11, 12:46 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2004
Location: PA
Posts: 178
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
The floors were already there. The two doors were smashed in and the glass was broken when I acquired the house, so I had to replace them.
 
  #12  
Old 02-24-11, 02:39 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Well, alrighty, then. I have never heard of a finished floor extending under a door's threshold. Doors are set on subflooring and the finished flooring butted up to the brown piece you see, making your mountain a molehill. I wonder how they acclimated the flooring without doors in place? Again, curious.
What XSleeper has advised would be your best alternative, unless you want to scribe the flooring, remove the door, cut the flooring, reset the door and retrim. Naaaa, didn't think so.
 
  #13  
Old 02-24-11, 04:36 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,226
Received 1,715 Upvotes on 1,539 Posts
At least the door doesn't drag on a floor rug when you open it!
 
  #14  
Old 02-25-11, 03:48 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Always thinking of the bright side of life, ain'tcha???
 
  #15  
Old 02-25-11, 04:35 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,226
Received 1,715 Upvotes on 1,539 Posts
A "good" carpenter can always put a positive spin on his mistakes. LOL
 
  #16  
Old 02-26-11, 05:44 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 36,608
Upvotes: 0
Received 9 Upvotes on 8 Posts
Like "hey, now ya got more head clearance".....or "helps to better keep drafts out".....or "keeps the water from your leaky dishwasher from leaking to the outside and freezing, sort of like a dam". I love it!
 
  #17  
Old 02-26-11, 05:58 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 26,226
Received 1,715 Upvotes on 1,539 Posts
LOL, exactly!!!
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: