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Horizontal single slider window pane replacement.......is this simple job?

Horizontal single slider window pane replacement.......is this simple job?


  #1  
Old 06-08-11, 08:07 PM
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Horizontal single slider window pane replacement.......is this simple job?

I need to repair a broken horizontal single sliding window. The broken glass is the fixed stationary panel only. I'd like to do just order the sash and install it myself. I had to get the same type window replaced some years ago. If I remember correctly, the installer just pried out the sash and glued the new one in. Does this sound right?

I took three photos of another window of same type as broken one. On one or two of the photos, the little silver strip you see is sandwiched between double-paned glass. And it looks like you can see glue or adhesive also. The photos can be found at [IMG] Pictures by paisano184 - Photobucket /[/IMG]

I this not difficult? What tools do I use, what needs to be removed, and how do I measure the dimensions of the sash to be replaced?

Thanks,
Dave
 
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Old 06-09-11, 06:29 PM
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I really can't see how to remove it but when you finally get it out, I would have a glass shop replace the glass & reinstall it. That way you don't have to measure anything.
 
  #3  
Old 06-09-11, 08:23 PM
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its not difficult if you have the right tools and dont break or bend anything getting it out. The glass comes as a unit, called an insulating glass unit (double paned, with the aluminum spacer sealed between). A glass company would be best suited to measure the correct size. If you try to do it and get it wrong, youre kind of screwed because it will either fit or not fit. If it's not the right thickness, the glazing strips on the outside won't go back on correctly.

Basically you remove the glazing strips on the outside that hold the glass into the sealant. Then you go on the inside and cut the sealant. (special tool) It's nice to have a suction cup to remove the glass but you might be able to push it out from the inside once the sealant is cut. You also need rubber setting blocks around the perimeter, to cushion and provide space around the new glass. A glass company has a laser that can accurately measure the thickness. As mentioned, they would be youre best bet.
 
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Old 06-10-11, 06:59 AM
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Yeah, I think I have to agree with you guys. At $120.00, probably best to pay someone to do it. I was also concerned about the measurement. Since it is a small window, I might do it myself anyway just to learn.
 
  #5  
Old 06-10-11, 04:17 PM
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If you do, be very careful with those exterior glazing strips. If you bend or break them ur screwed. If DIY, I'd recommend you tearout the old glass, and then cut a piece of plywood the right size and thickness to fill in the hole temporarily. You can then take the glass measurements to the glass shop and order your new IGU.

Try not to pull off the outer piece of glass... you need to get the old one out in one piece in order to accurately measure how thick the new one should be.

A deglazing tool is what you need to cut the silicone that is around the inside perimeter. The way I always tell people to make their own, is to buy a cheap pizza cutter where the handle is riveted to ONE side, not both sides, and bend the handle at about a 22.5 degree angle, just enough so that you can slide the pizza cutter disk in about 1/2" deep between the glass and the frame. You will need to run that tool all the way around the IGU in order to deglaze the silicone that is holding it in. (you do this after you've removed the outer glazing strips). As you cut the silicone you can push on the glass with one hand and tell if u have it all the way loose or not.

Once you get the old one out, measure the thickness carefully, usually to the nearest 1/16th of an inch. Believe it or not, there's a big difference between a 3/4" thick glass and one that's 13/16". If u measure wrong, you find that out when you go to put the glazing strips back on and they are either too loose or too tight as a result of the glass being the wrong thickness.
 
 

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