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Door jamb repair with wood filler, do I need additional wood?

Door jamb repair with wood filler, do I need additional wood?


  #1  
Old 07-07-11, 05:55 AM
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Door jamb repair with wood filler, do I need additional wood?

The total area that need filled is 4" high, 1 1/2" wide with varying depths, the deepest is 1".

Very old house, repaired before by previous owners with unknown filler except I did pull out some caulking, old filler and chunks of cardboard. I scraped all the loose debris and old repair away so now I have a large area in the jamb.

I need to know if wood filler/putty can be used to the 1" depth or if I need to get anything else (what?) when I go to town for supplies today. Also can I fill it all at once or do I need to do it in stages letting each dry before adding more?

Thanks,
kjh9835
 
  #2  
Old 07-07-11, 06:08 AM
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A pic showing the damage might be helpful.

I'd be leery of using that much filler although I suppose it would be ok. Would it be possible to insert some new wood so you wouldn't have to use so much filler?
 
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Old 07-07-11, 06:51 AM
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if the deepest area is 1", maybe it would be possible to use something 3/4 thick and then just shim behind it to hold it out where you need it to be? Cut or chisel out more in order to get a more uniform surface that you can match with your wood block. You always want to use wood and wood glue (or a construction adhesive like PL polyurethane) to solidly fix the wood. Then just use the wood filler (Minwax two-part or Bondo body putty) to fill in any minor voids. Most fillers work best in stages if thick. But they also don't sand well, so unless you have a grinder and a flap sanding disk, don't put too much on or you'll be sorry.
 
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Old 07-07-11, 07:31 AM
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Thank you for your replies. Can you buy just a small piece of something 3/4" thick? I was thinking of "craft" type wood that you can get piece by piece but it's pretty thin and soft so prob. not the best thing to get. On the other hand, I don't need a whole sheet of plywood to fix the door.

My husband is on a long stretch of 12 hr shifts and I am tired of keep the door closed with a band of elastic tied to the oven door but the porch is full of windows and the dogs keep getting in the trash can. I thought if I knew what to get, I could fix it myself. It's a two hour drive round trip to town and I would like to get stuff while I am there today.

kjh9835
 
  #5  
Old 07-07-11, 08:31 AM
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Sounds like a short 1x2" would suffice
 
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Old 07-07-11, 12:15 PM
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You might try stopping at a construction site - most will have scrap pieces of wood that they would likely let you have for free.

Mitch suggested a 1x2 which is actually 3/4" x 1.5" I don't know if you can get them in lengths shorter than 8' although many stores will cut the lumber for you.
 
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Old 07-07-11, 05:15 PM
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marksr....that's what the big box store guy said, find a cabinet maker or woodworker as you only need a scrap piece. I'm gonna check with the maintenance guy at work tomorrow and see if he has anything either at work or at home. If not, I'll pick up a 1x2 next trip back to town Saturday and get it cut while I'm there.

Thanks,kjh9835
 
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Old 07-07-11, 07:13 PM
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Don't forget the Minwax wood filler. It will make the surface better than before. It will require some scraping and sanding, as mentioned earlier, but worth it.
 
  #9  
Old 07-09-11, 09:46 PM
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..Sounds like shims may be needed since the depth varies. If glue is used, I prefer TiteBond Construction adhesive vs PL - much stronger and sets up faster..(my prefered adhesive). Then use the wood filler..probably in a few stages so that the previous coat dries 1st..tho its more coats, you'll get better results.. - been there, done that..!
I presume the repair is in between hinges..or not near the strike side.. ?!?
 
 

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