Basement Metal Window Frame Problem


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Old 09-25-11, 10:44 AM
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Basement Metal Window Frame Problem

Hello,

Attempting to remove rusty metal window frame that is embedded into concrete. Thought i was making progress. Cut frame completely through on bottom but hit snag on corners. Looks like to me like the corners are really embedded into concrete. Please refer to photo below.Sides seem to release fairly easily between cutting and prying. Guess I dont know what I am doing and should have called professional!! Guess I will have to but on limited budget. Is this what they did in most 1965 basements? Any ideas would be appreciated!!

Thx

 
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Old 09-25-11, 11:27 AM
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The iron is embedded in the cement a little farther than what you have cut. Generally I will start basement window tearout by prying the top piece down first then cutting it in half, as it is "sometimes" not embedded in concrete, but is up against the sill plate. An angle grinder (use 1/16" x 4 1/2" blades) comes in handy to make these cuts in the iron frame, which I cut in half so that you can get under it and pry it up. Cutting "most" of the way through the iron will usually allow the frame to bend inward, which it will do once you can get your prybar behind it. (You will obviously be busting off a little concrete as you do this, but usually that will all either be getting replaced or at least covered up with trim.) A rotary hammer with a chisel attachment set on "hammer" will help to loosen the iron up in the cement, as will a lot of wiggling back and forth. You could also use it to chip off the cement around the perimeter of the frame, but I usually skip that step. Basically, by cutting each side in half, you've sliced the frame into 4 corner sections and are creating weak spots in the frame that you can then attempt to pry out. With a lot of prying and wiggling on each end, you can usually then get that whole corner piece to fall out.

You could use a reciprocating saw to make these cuts, but the cement will dull your blades real fast, and you need to cut the iron deeper. (thus, the angle grinder usually works better. Those abrasive blades usually come in 2 kinds, for steel and for masonry, and truthfully, a masonry blade will also cut steel, just not as well. So look for either kind. The important thing is the 1/16" blade thickness for cutting.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 02:47 PM
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I can't add anything about the window removal but agree with the dual purpose of those metal cutting fiber blades. I don't think I've ever bought a masonry blade but I almost always have a metal blade on hand and many times I've made cuts in masonry with those blades or the ones on my grinders and they appeared [at least to me ] to cut the masonry well.
 
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Old 09-25-11, 04:12 PM
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Just seems that the corners are deeply embedded on bottom and that I wont be able to remove frame around corners without re-moving large amounts of concrete. They surely did not think ahead in the 60's about need for replacement years later! Guess they figured it was better to use metal instead of wood frame.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 12:12 PM
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What to do about damaged concrete

Hello,

Started to remove old steel embedded frame that was in bad condition.How do I repair the stop for new vinyl window unit that I want to install. Can I just patch up the eroded locations? There seems to be parts of it that will support the window still left although I am not finished ripping old frame out. What kind of concrete can I use and would it set if I just want to rebuild damaged parts. See photos,

Thanks!!


https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-t...2/IMG_2844.JPG

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-J...0/IMG_2843.JPG
 
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Old 10-20-11, 04:29 PM
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I would probably chip off the parts you are thinking of cleaning up, and smooth it out with a cup grinder. Then shim the window in place and caulk around it. Or add a stop made from Azek or similar and push the window against that. Hard to say.

It looks like they poured the whole foundation around those windows!!! Not what I was initially picturing at all.
 
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Old 10-20-11, 04:57 PM
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Azek, That is the what my deck is made out of! Is that what you are saying to use? Or can I cut piece of Pergo strips and glue it to the existing concrete stop, so new window can sit against a solid piece? What kind of glue can I use? Or are you saying to get rid of existing concrete stops entirely?
Thanks for any info!
 
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Old 10-20-11, 08:31 PM
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Yeah that is what I was thinking, to get rid of the existing concrete stops entirely... depending on what size the window is, of course. No, do not use Pergo, use something that is more suitable for exterior use. The Azek I was referring to is not decking necessarily, but white 1x pvc stock. You can buy it in your bigger stores as 1x4 or 1x6, etc. The Azek could then make your new stops, which would be caulked to the mortar on the outside edge, and caulked to the window on the inside edge.

Depending on the size of the window, you may not need stops at all. You might just be able to clean the opening up, shim the window in, attach with screws if the mfg suggests it, andthen caulk the inside and outside perimeter with a nice 3/8- 1/2" wide bead of sealant. Just saying.

Otherwise- when I get a window where the mortar is in ugly shape like that- I'll make an interior and exterior trim that is all preassembled and shot together (interior and exterior jambs are the "stops" but preassembled in the shape of a box, then "face trim" in the shape of a picture frame is applied to the face of the interior and exterior jambs to act like casing.) You can cover up a multitude of sins with trim.
 
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Old 10-24-11, 02:55 PM
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Thinking about widening window opening a bit

Hello,

Now , after many weeks of sweating I finally removed rest of embedded steel frame. If I want to make the window opening a bit wider , like 1" or so wider, would this be easy to do and would i need permit to do this? What kind of machine can I use and whats best way to keep down dust? This is a poured concrete opening.

Thanks for advice
 
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Old 10-24-11, 05:03 PM
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Well if you are just talking about removing that cement "stop" from each side, you could probably just grind that off with a cup grinder. The only reason you would need a permit is if you live in one of those area where you need a permit to do "any sort" of improvement.

Since it is a poured foundation, it probably won't chip off too evenly or I would suggest you use a 1 1/8" rotary hammer and chisel attachment, and chip from the inside to get the majority of it chipped away. The thing I would be afraid of is that if you weren't careful you could take a big hunk out and that wouldn't be good.

An angle grinder with a diamond cup grinder would do the trick fairly quickly (maybe 5 minutes per side?) but you'd need to block the dust from entering the basement and you'd want a respirator and goggles. And maybe someone holding a shop vac nozzle to catch half the dust. You'd just need to grind a little at a time and keep checking your progress with a straightedge and/or level.

A gas powered saw would make a clean cut but that would also create a lot of dust and is probably more tool than you need for this task. It also won't get into the corners, so on such a small window it might be overkill.
 
 

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