condensation on windows

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  #1  
Old 12-18-11, 12:44 PM
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condensation on windows

I'm not sure how to start my own thread, but I have a condensation problem. My home is old and has always had condensation on the windows. About three days ago four new windows were installed. This morning we woke up to more water on the windows than I've ever seen. The walls around the window that were replaced are wet and the ceiling near the edge of the window side wall has wet spots with visible drips. We went up to the attic and didn't see and water however the attic is not insulated properly. Is all that water from bad insallation? OMG its bad.
 
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Old 12-26-11, 07:35 AM
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It sounds like you have a tropical storm in there. I live in an old house with no insulation & never see condensation. Hot is meeting cold somewhere. What part of the country are you located. What's the outside temperature & what type of heating system do you have?
 
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Old 12-26-11, 02:07 PM
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It could be the humidity level inside the house is too high - especially if the outside temp got very low over night. We have that problem from time to time - have to lower the humidity level in the house when it gets cold outside. That wouldn't explain the moisture on the walls, though.
 
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Old 12-26-11, 03:05 PM
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Cold walls and high inside humidity would explain the moisture on the walls. When you say you have to occasionally lower the humidity when it is cold, are you running a humidifier and what level is it set for?

The solution is going to be air seal to reduce the air exchange and then insulate to further reduce heat loss and bring your home into balance with a reasonable amount of humidity and less risk of condensation.

Bud
 
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Old 12-27-11, 06:04 PM
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Yes, we have a whole house humidifier. At temps above freezing or so, we set it at around 35% but when it gets down into the 20s we get condensation on the inside of the glass in the patio doors in the bedroom. It has to get down into the teens or lower to get condensation on the rest of the doors and windows. Not sure why just the patio doors in the bedroom. Been thinking of looking into a humidifier control that measures outside temp.
 
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Old 12-27-11, 06:23 PM
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Condensation inside the glass is an indication the seal has failed and the double glass unit is no longer performing as well as it should. I'll attach a RH calculator for you to play with as it will help you understand what inside temperatures are going to be a problem with that 35% RH.

Example: 35% RH at 70 will turn into moisture at 49. Doors and windows are typically poorly insulated and thus get colder as the outside temp goes down. Even though the inside RH is 35%, that same moisture contend represents 100% RH at 49 (the dew point), thus condensation.

Temperature, Dewpoint, and Relative Humidity Calculator

Bud
 
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Old 12-28-11, 02:22 AM
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Thanks for the calculator Bud. Should help us fine tune the humidifier. I mis-spoke - the moisture is on the indoor side of the glass not inside the double glass. We had that problem on the front door glass and Therma Tru is replacing it.
 
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Old 01-11-12, 08:27 AM
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I actually just posted a response on a similar question, so I'll give you the same advice in hopes that it helps!
This happens when the materials used around the edges of the window pane is too conductive (ex: aluminum or other conductive metals).
Even if the glass is energy efficient, the frame and spacer material may not be. The temperature can seep through and cause frost or condesation on the glass, which is what it sounds like you're describing. I found a little information at******. There are some other links in there that explain it a little more in depth.
 

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