Deal with stucco wall for an entry door

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  #1  
Old 01-05-12, 02:02 PM
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Deal with stucco wall for an entry door

Hi friends,

I have already removed the existing door and in the process also damaged some stucco and also the existing stucco mould.
I think repairing stucco is beyond me and so come up with a plan.

The door jamb is 4.5" deep and the stud is 3.5" deep, also the drywall inside is 0.5" thick. I will make the inside jamb flush with the drywall, so then the jamb will stick out 0.5" from the stud on the outside. To make the stud flush with the jamb, I will nail 0.5" thick plywood on top of the stud.

I will use 1" thick redwood (or P/T wood) as the brickmoulding and install it to butt against 3/4" thick stucco. First I will mark with the redwood and cut the stucco with diamond blade to make it straight, and then insert building paper to cover stud and door jamb. Because I already made the stud and door jamb flush, I will just screw (with deck screws) the redwood to the stud and door jamb and butt against stucco. Then I will seal all the joints with PL caulk. Finally paint the door jamb, redwood mould, door with external & waterproof paints.

My questions:
1. how does water get through stucco?
2. Will there be water drops inside stucco?
3. I only insert building paper to cover the jamb and stud. Is it enough to protect them from water?
4. Also on the head of the door, should I insert something (drip edge?) to direct water out?
5. Do you think if the plan work? If not, why?

I appreciate your advice greatly.

Bill
 
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  #2  
Old 01-05-12, 04:31 PM
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Welcome to the forums Bill!

#1 - stucco is somewhat porous and will absorb moisture. It pretty much has to get saturated for water to go complexly thru. Paint will slow the process down with some types of coatings pretty much waterproofing the stucco.

#2 - from where?

#3 - is it sealed to the rest of the house wrap?

#4 - is there a roof overhang? if so, how wide and how far up? or is this a gable end?

#5 - I'm a painter not a mason but depending on some of your answers, it might work ok. I'm sure there will be others with more advice chiming in later
 
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Old 01-05-12, 08:33 PM
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Rather than cutting the stucco back to where the anticipated edge of your trim will be, you will probably be better off cutting a rabbet in the outside edge of your trim so that it actually laps OVER the stucco edge. This technique (and other precautions like incorporating new housewrap and window flashing tape into the old WRB) was featured in the article "Replacing Doors in Stucco" in the 7/07 issue of Journal of Light Construction. I'm not a big fan of this technique but in some cases its probably the best alternative.

Also, if you are going to paint the trim, Azek or Versatex might be a better alternative to wood trim. Please don't use PT wood as trim!
 
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Old 01-06-12, 11:12 AM
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P1060286 | Flickr - Photo Sharing!

XSleeper and marksr,

Thank you very much for your advice.
I am attaching a photo of the door. The photo can clarify many questions I asked so please take a look give more advice.



XSleeper, how do I get a copy of the article you were talking about? I want to do the wrap and flashing right as well. Do you mean it is not a good idea to paint redwood? what material is the trim you mentioned? The particular trims are not sold nearby.

Again about stucco: my stucco wall has many hair like cracks vertically. Should I ask professional to seal them and then paint it waterproof? Then will it not be breathable?

BTW, I locate in the bay area where the weather is mild and there is not a lot of rain (except in winter).
 
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Old 01-06-12, 01:16 PM
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a 'data base error' ate my post
oh well, let me try again,

The composites XSleeper mentioned aren't the same as real wood and as such aren't subject to weather related deterioration. They also take paint well.

The majority of my stucco painting experience comes from fla. When hairline cracks needed to disappear and/or waterproofing was needed, we would prime [if unpainted] and then apply a good coat of an elastromeric paint. That would prevent water/moisture from entering the stucco. It would seem to me that if there is a vapor barrier on the inside and the stucco is well painted on the outside - the stucco wouldn't need to breathe.
 
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Old 01-06-12, 05:26 PM
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The magazine website is jlconline dot com. I would link to it but you need to be signed up as a jlc archive member to read the old articles. Not sure if you could find a library that subscribed to it or not. they usually keep a file of old magazines.

The Azek and Versatex is lumber made from solid PVC. It won't rot or crack and it holds paint well. You can certainly use redwood but for a little more you could use something that would never wear out. Lowes and HD both sell a similar product, probably a different brand.

We can't really make a judgement call on the stucco since we can't see it. But if they are "hairline" cracks it is probably not a big deal. But if it is wide enough to stick a credit card into, that's a problem and yes you should have those repaired.
 
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