water seeping under sliding glass door frame

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  #1  
Old 04-23-12, 01:08 PM
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water seeping under sliding glass door frame

Hello everyone,

Background - Just bought this house about 3 months ago, it was completely renovated before purchase, so most of the frame is new, all new windows, doors, flooring etc. There is a small deck (probably 2 feet wide) off the master bedroom, accessed via a large sliding glass door in said master bedroom, which is carpeted.

Problem - Yesterday, a big rainstorm came through (soaking storm with periods of steady rain, approximately 2 inches fell), in the evening I noticed some dampness in the carpet next to the door. Feeling around, it feels like water was coming in from underneath the frame. It did not feel like a lot, but was definitely noticable. How can I fix this? I was thinking of getting some caulk and putting down a strip on the base of the frame outside (waiting to to do this unitl its dry). Would that work? Is there a better solution?

I would rather nip this problem in the bud, since as I said, we just bought this house, and I'd rather not major issues develop!

Thank you in advance for the feedback.
 
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Old 04-23-12, 04:18 PM
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What kind of siding is out there, and can you supply any pictures of the door, deck and siding so we can have an idea what you're up against?

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/el...-pictures.html
 
  #3  
Old 04-24-12, 02:52 PM
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now with pictures

sorry about not including pictures before - rookie mistake, I suppose.

Anyways, the siding outside is hardiplank, the door is a pella, and construction/installation was completed about a year ago to my knowledge. Upon taking the pictures, I noticed a small gap between the door frame and the exterior tiles, which looks like the likely culprit.

First picture is the door edge with the siding:


Second is the door from the interior:


Third is a close up of the track (yes, I do need to clean it):


Finally, here is the door frame from the exterior. Getting this shot makes me think this gap is my problem:
 
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Old 04-24-12, 04:36 PM
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My guess, and XSleeper may have a differing view, is the door was not embedded in proper silicone bed during the initial install. Of course having tile higher than the threshold bottom precludes investigation.
 
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Old 04-24-12, 05:44 PM
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I had a nice big reply written, but it got eaten somehow.

Chandler may certainly be right but I have a couple other concerns. I'm not real familiar with that vinyl Pella door (its the Thermastar company's door that they took over) but what concerns me (besides all the dirt and junk that could be plugging up the weep holes inside the tracks) is the tile outside and how that tile is higher than your subfloor inside. That's very bad.

Doors like that usually have weep holes along the bottom and if your door does, the tile and grout would block any water that is trying to exit out the front weep holes. Not a good scenario any way you look at it.

Also concerning is the gap below the siding on the left exterior view. I wonder if there is any flashing there, or if water can just run back against the house, get behind the trim, and run into the rough opening.

You "could" caulk the little crack where the grout meets the door (latex sanded tile caulking to match the color of the grout) but I'm not sure that is your solution in this case.

I'd remove the sliding door, remove any snap-in pieces that will come out, and clean the bottom of the door well. While you do that, look for weep holes in the frame. If you have weep holes, there has to be someplace for that water to exit. If the exit to the weep hole is covered up, THAT is the problem.

Removing the door and raising it up 1/2" or so to expose the weep holes would be the solution. I'd probably use Azek PVC as the 1/2 spacer material and would make sure the spacer is sealed up well with some PL Polyurethane, and that the door is set in a bed of it.
 
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