Fix for leaking windows?

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  #1  
Old 06-04-12, 08:48 PM
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Fix for leaking windows?

I have a "Wall" of glass panes that are framed into wooden framing with trim stops on both sides of the glass. This past weekend, wind driven rain blew onto the glass and very bad leaking through the stops. Question is; do I need to remove the stops and re seal? if so, with what? or can I apply a bead of clear silicone caulking to the stops as in this diagram and leave the stops as they are? (for some reason the photo is rotated 1/4 turn, sorry)

Ive added a picture of the wall so you get an idea of the scale that i'm up against.

Thanks,
Mike.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-05-12, 12:27 AM
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There should have been a bed of flexible sealant between the glass and the inside stop laid in when the glass was first installed. At this point I have no suggestions.
 
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Old 06-05-12, 03:13 AM
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I agree with Furd. Can you remove the stops, one at a time and ensure there is sealant between the glass and framing as well as the stop? It looks daunting with the size and shape of the glass. Your best bet aside from removing all that stop is to lay in a good sealant. I would recommend an elastomeric caulk/sealant. One that comes to mind is Big Stretch. With the changes in weather, heat, cold, wet, dry, snow, etc. the original sealant may be cracked. Remove what you can of the old and lay in a good bead of elastomeric. It will give and take better than silicone and isn't affected by sunlight like silicone is.
 
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Old 06-05-12, 01:21 PM
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Thanks Furd and Chandler.
I'm sure you are correct, but I have to ask; If the seal is only on the inside between the stop and the glass, wouldn't that allow water to get trapped between the outside stop and the glass and between the outside stop and the frame that would quickly lead to rot?
thanks!
 
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Old 06-05-12, 01:41 PM
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Not really...
If the inside stop is sealed to the glass then any water that hits the outside should be able to weep out and evaporate since it appears that any sealant to the outside stop has failed.

To do it right...you would need to remove the inside stop...cut through whatever sealant might be between glass and outside stop, remove glass, clean off old sealant, apply new, then re-install glass and inside stop.

As an easier fix (that glass looks pretty big!)...what you suggest might be a better way. You'll have to stay on top of it though, it will be a yearly thing to check and re-caulk.

I guess thats why glass and window restoration companies charge a pretty penny for this kinda work.


Note....Furd may have misspoken. I've never seen a window that was sealed to the interior stop. unless it was an old one that used glazing compound.
 
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Old 06-05-12, 02:40 PM
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Thanks, given the size of the project, i'm going to have to try the easy way (same as my drawing).
I ordered a case of "Big Stretch". At some point in the future, I would like to replace the glass with double paned IGU's. at which time, I'll make sure it's done right.

Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 06-05-12, 04:02 PM
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I would just add that if you keep damp sponge or rag handy - it will help you keep the glass clean when you apply the caulking
 
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Old 06-11-12, 08:13 PM
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Note....Furd may have misspoken. I've never seen a window that was sealed to the interior stop. unless it was an old one that used glazing compound.
The replacement windows (glass only) in my previous house were bedded with an elastomeric tape that completely sealed the glass to the frame/ inside stop. Then the outside stops were replaced with no sealant, bedding or anything. While I haven't removed any glass in this house the same elastomeric tape was used (as evidenced by some localized "creepage" on the inside) as the other house. Of course, both houses had/have wood-framed windows. It may be different for vinyl or aluminum frames as I have never looked that closely at the other materials.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 05:56 AM
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Thanks for the info Furd. Like I said...never saw it...but that doesn't mean it doesn't exist...lol.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 10:59 AM
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I ended up borrowing a friends metal break and made up some flashing. it looked pretty good until i butchered the caulking. I set a bead of caulking in first, then pressed in the flashing and added a second bead after that as well. I used Pro Flex caulking, the guy at the building materials store said he thought it was better than Big Stretch. we'll see...
I only flashed the bottom not the sides, but re caulked the sides.
As always, I appreciate all the advice I get.
 
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Old 06-12-12, 04:47 PM
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Generally the only sort of sealant you should use when glazing directly to glass is silicone. Mainly because silicone is more user-friendly when it comes to deglazing it, and replacing it someday down the road. Silicone comes off pretty clean with a razor blade. When the proflex gets old you will probably cuss when you go to remove it. I like Proflex, just not for glazing glass. A Terratone colored silicone (light bronze) would probably be a pretty close match.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 08:22 AM
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Now you tell me!

guess i will have to cross that bridge when i come to it. I'm surprised to hear that though because the glass is such a smooth hard surface, why would a razor blade have difficulty cutting it off cleanly?

Thanks!
 
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Old 06-13-12, 09:53 AM
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Never used it...but I imagine it's somewhat like removing construction adhesive. Silicone comes off glass pretty easy with a sharp razor blade...const adhesive has to almost be chipped off if it's well bonded. It just doesn't slice or peel normally.
 
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Old 06-13-12, 11:50 AM
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that will be a good time to upgrade to insulated glass units and a new aluminum frame from a glass company!
Thanks again to everyone. This site is the greatest!
 
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