Shallow Mortised Doors

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  #1  
Old 11-10-12, 08:53 PM
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Shallow Mortised Doors

I've been replacing the interior doors in my home over the past several years and have noticed that some of them are not mortised deep enough. I haven't been keeping track of the manufacturers, but I don't understand why door manufacturers are mortising there doors so shallow that standard hardware does not fit. I've had to remove the plates from multiple hardware kits because they do not sit flush with the door, and instead use the smaller cylindrical piece, which looks cheesy. What's the deal?
 
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Old 11-11-12, 02:58 AM
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Poor quality control, ill setting of the mortising bits in the factory, people who don't care. There's your reasons. Now, why don't you just mortise them deeper with a chisel and razor knife so they will fit flush, rather than adapting the hardware?
 
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Old 11-11-12, 08:51 AM
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...because I know I wouldn't be able to do as good a job as I would like, so I feel more comfortable using the different hardware. Not a big deal, just irritating. The hardware says the mortise on the door should be 3/16", but it's more like 1/16"...not even close.
 
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Old 11-11-12, 09:09 AM
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I think it may be somewhat due to the hardware. I think they have changed somewhat in the last 20 yrs. At least the typical off the shelf stuff has. Not only do you have the visible faceplate, but there is also a backing plate which is a part of the mechanism. Makes it thicker. Maybe not all brands of hardware are like that...but it's easier to remove some wood thickness than to add it back.

Kinda the same as why are all the mortices rounded now? Because you can easily square the mortice, but not turn square in to curved.

btw...those cylindrical parts are for doors that haven't been morticed at all...just a hole drilled. Normally referred to as "drive in". I agree...using those in a morticed door would look cheesy...I would have said crappy.
 
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Old 11-11-12, 09:19 AM
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Maybe it is time you get yourself a small trim router and straight bit. That will do most of the work for you and you only have to use the chisel near the edges of the mortise. If you really want to do it easy, get a small mortise bit for the router and a template jig for doing hinges. 1/2'' Pattern Router Bit - Rockler Woodworking Tools
 
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Old 11-13-12, 10:21 AM
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Yes, "crappy" was the word I was looking for. I wonder if I can use the cylindrical "drive-in" piece then install the front plate over top? The backplate is the causing the clearance problem but the cylindrical piece isn't as thick so it may work.
 
  #7  
Old 11-29-12, 07:23 PM
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Trying to adapt a conventional latch plate to a drive-in type would probably be more trouble than it's worth. A good sharp (& I mean SHARP) 1" wood chisel on the typical soft wood doors you get nowadays is the way to go....don't use hammer or mallet, just work a little wood out at a time & you'll get that perfect fit.
 
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Old 12-01-12, 01:06 PM
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Ok. I'll have to try that.
 
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