Using molding rather than window glazing?


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Old 11-11-12, 11:09 AM
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Using molding rather than window glazing?

Hi folks -

I have a real hard (I mean horrible) time glazing my old double-hung windows. This time I have the sashes on a workbench. Thought that would help. Maybe it helps a little, but not enough.

I just came across an article that says you can actually use molding instead of glazing if you want to. It says you can try inch quarter-round molding that you miter. You then would use brads and a brad-pusher tool to fasten the molding to the sash.

That sounds great to me. Im sure pros would laugh at how long that would take, but it would be a whole lot faster than I can go now (You wouldnt even believe me if I told you how long it takes me to do one pane, and it still looks sloppy.)

My question is: Is using molding instead of glazing a bad idea.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!
 
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Old 11-11-12, 11:48 AM
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Interior....I don't see a problem. Exterior...well...I don't think it would work very well.

It's all about technique and materials used.

I watched a home show where they visited a restoration company and the woman doing the re-glazing did an entire sash in about 2 minutes using a style I had never seen before. I won't try to describe it, but it didn't involve long snakes pushed in with a putty knife at all.

Her tools were her hands and a putty knife for striking off excess...that was it.
 
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Old 11-11-12, 01:01 PM
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Exterior...well...I don't think it would work very well.



Ahhhh Shuckssss!!!!



Yea, I was thinking you could use a good oil-based primer and paint the molding but I guess you'd wind up with glazing anyway to fill the cracks, and maybe that wouldn't work right anyway!

Thanks Gunguy.


 
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Old 11-11-12, 01:08 PM
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Moulding will not work for an exterior window. You need the glazing putty to seal water out. This type of work isn't easy.
 
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Old 11-11-12, 01:42 PM
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Moulding will not work for an exterior window. You need the glazing putty to seal water out.

thanks droo!

This type of work isn't easy.
Oh I agree 100% and even more than that.LOL

I did a few last year and I would be ashamed to tell you how much time it took. You would think Im mentally unbalanced.LOL But Im really stubborn and I dont give up!! I switched from DAP33 to SW66 but that doesnt seem to make much difference.

My problem is with the consistency of the glazing. Too cold, too warm, not enough oil, too much oil? Roll the stiff clean putty knife down this time with mineral spirits (sometimes) and you get a nice smooth surface on the glazing. Do the same thing (it appears) again, and you get a rough pitted surface? Was it too dry? Was it too oily? Was it too cold? What changed?

Pulls out of the rabbet when you run the knife? Wood not prepped properly? Loose material in rabbet? No. Mix a new batch and try again, and maybe this time it works. etc.

Enough of my problems and ranting. LOL

Ill just keep experimenting!

Thanks droo!
 
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Old 11-12-12, 05:20 AM
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While I've used both, I prefer SWP's 66 glazing over Dap's glazing - the 66 isn't as oily
You can also get glazing in a caulking tube.

If the glazing is too oily to use, put it in a rag and work it around until the rag absorbs some of the excess oil. You can work in a little mineral spirits if the glazing is too dry.

I like to just push the glazing in place with my thumb and then smooth it out with a flexible putty knife. IMO a putty knife works better than a glazing knife but I suppose it all depends on how you learned and what you used.

The correct method for glazing a window is to; remove all loose glazing/paint and use an old brush to remove all the debris, oil prime any raw wood, apply glazing after primer dries, reprime with oil 24 hrs later - then apply 1-2 coats of finish paint [latex is fine]
 
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Old 11-12-12, 09:33 AM
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Thanks mark for all that excellent advice. Seems like you have given me way to have better control over the consistency. Ill be back doing that work soon and cant wait to give all that a try.

But I want to make sure of one thing. Are you saying that its OK to put primer on the glazing within 24 hours? That business about waiting until the glazing skims over has me a little confused. I dont ever remember seeing the glazing skim over last year when I did it. (I have to keep better records. I usually write all results down.)
 
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Old 11-12-12, 10:23 AM
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It's best to let the glazing "dry" for 24 hrs or so but you can fudge a little bit. The main thing is to let the glazing dry out some so the oils in the glazing won't have an adverse effect on the primer/paint. Glazing takes a long time to dry and become brittle but if you try to paint over fresh glazing right away - you are fighting against yourself. Glazing over refers to the top portion of the glazing have 'dried' 24 hrs or so is best but at least give it overnight before priming.
 
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Old 11-12-12, 10:28 AM
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Thanks a lot mark. Gotcha!

Can't wait to get back to the job. I'll post back when it's done. (I have 2 speeds: slow and stop.)LOL
 
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Old 11-17-12, 06:02 PM
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While I've used both, I prefer SWP's 66 glazing over Dap's glazing - the 66 isn't as oily
You can also get glazing in a caulking tube.

If the glazing is too oily to use, put it in a rag and work it around until the rag absorbs some of the excess oil. You can work in a little mineral spirits if the glazing is too dry.

I like to just push the glazing in place with my thumb and then smooth it out with a flexible putty knife. IMO a putty knife works better than a glazing knife but I suppose it all depends on how you learned and what you used.

The correct method for glazing a window is to; remove all loose glazing/paint and use an old brush to remove all the debris, oil prime any raw wood, apply glazing after primer dries, reprime with oil 24 hrs later - then apply 1-2 coats of finish paint [latex is fine]



Just thought I'd update. Following above seems to be working out very well. I think pushing with the thumb works well and I'm using a putty knife. Can now also keep it from being too dry or too oily. I do now think I really like SWP's 66 better than DAP. But I'm still slower than molasses! LOL
 
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Old 11-17-12, 07:32 PM
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I always preferred the glazing knife, myself. My technique was always to work clockwise around the sash, doing one side at a time. Being right handed I found it was easiest to stand to the left and pull the putty knife toward me with my right hand. Then once I went right to left with the putty knife, I'd lightly take my finger and go left to right to smooth any ridges that the putty knife wanted to "lift up". (cuz sometimes the putty seems to want to lift up out of the corner as you pull & smooth it.)
 
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Old 11-18-12, 05:15 AM
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But I'm still slower than molasses!
Speed comes with practice the main thing is to do it right so it will last a long time
 
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Old 11-18-12, 11:15 AM
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Speed comes with practice the main thing is to do it right so it will last a long time


That makes sense mark. I think I'll be getting a lot of practice.

My technique was always to work clockwise around the sash, doing one side at a time. Being right handed I found it was easiest to stand to the left and pull the putty knife toward me with my right hand.

Funny that you mention that XSleeper. I just found that same thing to be better for me also. I was screwing up one side and something didn't feel right?Turned out sometimes I was standing to the right and contorting my wrist or something like that. So I just stand to the left now also. As mark says speed will come with practice, but just do it right.


Thanks guys!
 
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Old 12-05-12, 06:01 PM
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Hi marksr and folks

Just thought Id post this as it might be helpful to someone. Ive been using the excellent information posted on this thread to do glazing and it has been very helpful, but through experimentation I found something that also helped me.

I now run the putty knife really really slow down the glazing compound, like maybe like one inch per second or even much slower. That seems to help alleviate the problem (for me anyway) of the putty knife sticking (even when wet) to the surface of the glazing compound and winding up with tears in the surface or pulling the compound out of the groove.

I was thinking that maybe by going that slow I now get a very even pressure and constant angle on the putty knife as I pull it down the surface? Anyway seems to help me.

As marksr says:

Speed comes with practice the main thing is to do it right so it will last a long time
 
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Old 12-05-12, 07:44 PM
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It does help to go slow. A lot of that depends on the temperature, since glazing gets stiff when it's cold. When I first learned, my boss made me warm the putty up in my hands and kneed it like clay before using it. All that did was make my hands (and the putty knife) completely sticky. LOL
 
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Old 12-06-12, 04:28 AM
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my boss made me warm the putty up in my hands and kneed it like clay before using it. All that did was make my hands (and the putty knife) completely sticky
That's why I like SWP's 66 Glazing, compared to DAP it's not oily at all. Setting the quart can on the dash before heading to the job helps to warm it up [defroster running] Whenever you need to kneed glazing or putty, I like to put a rag between my hands and the putty - helps to keep my hands clean
 
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Old 12-06-12, 09:46 AM
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Those are very good tips marksr and XSleeper. I know I'm adding them to my bag of tricks! LOL
 
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Old 12-06-12, 04:04 PM
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As usual, I am late. I don't "do" windows, so I didn't have much to add. However, I was onsite the other day when my glass guy came by to replace a couple of fogged IGU's. They were originally held in with molding from the outside. I commented how odd that was, and that I had always thought glazing was the best for exterior installation. I watched as he installed the IGU's, and he explained that he sealed his IGU's in the frame so it didn't matter what you held it in with. Water wasn't getting past his sealant in the first place. He reused the molding and it looked fine. Just wanted to throw that bit of information out.
 
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Old 12-07-12, 11:33 AM
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Well I would like to say thanks chandler. The more information the better!
 
 

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