Building a window

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  #1  
Old 12-29-12, 07:10 AM
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Building a window

I have a couple of small, nonopening odd-sized wood frame windows that I need to replace in a 2x4 woodframe house, T1-11 siding. They're really just a frame and a pane, which at first glance seems simple enough to build myself - and the cost of custom replacements is crazy.

I'm not finding plans online but maybe my search terms are wrong. Just one YouTube video from a guy who admits to not know what he's doing and a lot about window boxes and such.

Can anyone help? There must be fine points I should know about before starting on this? Where to find this kind of info?
 
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Old 12-29-12, 07:26 AM
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Reason for replacement? Frame rot, seal broken, baseball thru the pane ?

Easiest would be replacement windows vs new construction. You would remove the sash and pane and inlay the new window in the opening and trim out.

New Construction Windows have a nailing flange on them. This gets complicated on a t-111 sided house. If you have existing trim around the windows (1x4) say, you can cut the opening just large enough to insert a window, nail it off and re-trim. Tougher still if your window is up on the 2nd story.

Give us some more detail, or post some pics that will help us guide you.
 
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Old 12-29-12, 07:37 AM
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Reason is rot (maybe, actually I'm not in there yet - but the siding is rotted around them) and one of the panes is cracked. Old ones were apparently site-built of wood. They are sized to fit custom framed stained-glass inserts that fit into the openings from inside the house, so they have to be the same size. Yes they are 1.5 (stair landing) and 2nd story.
 
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Old 12-29-12, 08:37 AM
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Side note, as long as you have to replace siding, use pressure treated t-111 so that you never have to make the same repair again in the future. Available at lumber yards and building supply houses.
 
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Old 12-29-12, 08:42 AM
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I've never seen T1-11 in PT anywhere. PT marine plywood yes but it would need the rough-cut T1-11 surface to look decent as siding. I have some experience with this house and the problem with the siding was that the builders didn't paint the back/edges of the siding.

I should clarify that the siding rot problems are primarily on walls under the gable ends where they get big-time exposure.

BTW I have a coworker with a house with similar construction. He had to replace some of the T1-11 so he took down an entire wall's siding, even the sheets that hadn't rotted. All had the backs painted about 2 feet up from what should have been the bottom edges of the sheets. But some sheets had been installed upside down (no paint at the bottom). These were the ones that had rotted.
 

Last edited by suobs; 12-29-12 at 09:07 AM.
  #6  
Old 12-29-12, 09:23 AM
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Call around. you should be able to find PT t-111 start with lumber yards. Did a repair to a house couple years ago. Used 27 sheets of it and replaced anyplace that had exposure similar to what you are dealing with. To remove, paint the backs and re-install doesn't make sense. Replace those obvious ones now with Pressure Treated sheets. Poke around, I can assure you that there is more rot than you are seeing. Also check the trim boards, Mostly at the tail ends and seams going up to the 2nd story on the corners of the house.

Secure the good intentions of a strong helper for this project. Those boards get mighty heavy 2 stories up....
 
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Old 12-29-12, 09:56 AM
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Who is the manufacturer and where did you buy it? Because I've never seen it and thought I knew everything there is to know about this stuff. Plus I live in an area where every 4th house is built this way. T1-11 has a "rough cut" outer ply that simulates rough-cut cedar boards.

Not sure who are you referri g to who is removing and painting the backs? Not me. The new plywood gets painted all sides. I'm just telling you what the problem is in high-exposure parts of the house. Yes the trim boards have the same problem (rot from bottom up because the backs were not painted) and in some cases higher up and behind where the edges weren't sealed and they're cedar.

Not to be too argumentative but you won't see problems with rot after "a couple of years" if it's painted, no matter what it is. The fact that you installed it doesn't mean it will work in the long term. Did you paint the backs? I filled some spots temporarily with sheathing (not full exposure) plywood five years ago and they're starting to crack on the surface but they're nowhere near rotting soft. Even unpainted plain pine boards won't deteriorate unless they have ground contact. What I'm talking about on the siding took over 17 years to develop. Same with my fried.

Also, I've seen a number of cases of unpainted PT rotting if it stays wet for long periods.
 
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Old 12-29-12, 10:10 AM
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I've built a few fixed and hinged basement sashes with 5/4 clear pine. Half lapped glued joints. Rabbited the glass side with a router and pilot bearing, square the corners with a chisel and putty the glass in. Used an ogee bit on the inside and left the corners round. Are these windows clear glass outside the stained glass or or do the have to hold the stained panel also?
 
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Old 12-29-12, 10:11 AM
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Actually I just did a seach and these pages are saying that T1-11 is by definition pressure-treated:

Pressure Treated Plywood Siding - YellaWood®
19/32 4x8 T1-11 4" OC Pressure Treated Plywood Siding 105595 at The Home Depot
 
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Old 12-29-12, 10:17 AM
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Toolmon, yes the clear glass is outside. The stained glass is separate, it's like a framed insert that mounts over and a bit into the interior stud wall cavity from the inside.
 
  #11  
Old 12-29-12, 10:49 AM
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Here's the way the existing windows were constructed. There's a simple box the depth of the stud bay. The corners are not even mitered, but this isn't visible from either side because both are high up. There's a rim of 1/2" trim on the inside and one on the outside with the pane sandwiched between them with clear silicone around the edges. They are attached to the studs, header and footer with nails (I would use screws if I redo them to make removal easier). After installation they were framed on the outside with trim. You see what I mean by "simple" . . . and why I don't want to spent $350 each for custom sized replacements.

Just thought there might be some refinements you guys might know that I should be aware of.
 
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Old 12-29-12, 11:09 AM
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Your right, not going to be argumentative, see below from my last customers invoices.

Just trying to be of some help with your siding replacement.

PTT-111_zps29b862e0.jpg photo by czizzi | Photobucket
 
  #13  
Old 12-29-12, 11:55 AM
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Did you install those windows? They're awesome! The boat is nice too!

I appreciate the help, I didn't know T1-11 was PT. Do you remember the brand on it?
 
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Old 12-29-12, 12:27 PM
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I believe it is Georgia Pacific but don't quote me on that. I just call the lumber yard and tell them how many sheets I need.

I did the crown molding in the round room and also the painting. Can't take credit for the windows on that one. The boat is where I would much rather be right now.
 
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Old 12-29-12, 11:17 PM
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The boat is where I would much rather be right now.
Summer's coming! The trim and paint look nice too.
 
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Old 12-31-12, 04:59 AM
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Window Plans

Google "sash window design plans" and you will get lots of hits. Hope this helps.
 
  #17  
Old 01-02-13, 06:28 PM
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building a direct set non-opening window is easy to do (assuming thats what you want). treated door jamb material, stop and glass is all thats needed. pics and measurements would help a lot.
 
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Old 01-20-13, 05:39 AM
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I could post photos later but I don't think they'll add much information - the windows are nothing fancy. Just a 1x frame fastened into the rough opening between the studs, and 2x trim nailed over the T1-11 siding after that's put on. I figure the top and bottom frame pieces that I build will have a good downward slope and flashing at the top. My main concern about reinstallation is, since there's no nailing flange to tape to the window rough opening, how to seal/tape/flash them so the existing problems don't recur - mainly leakage into/behind the wall, with rot of the rough opening area.

One is pretty small, about 9x24. I was wondering about 8x8x4 glass blocks.
 
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Old 02-19-13, 07:02 PM
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Getting back to my non-opening site-built windows (BTW I did find sketchy wood window plans in the 2d edition of this useful book: ‹http://www.amazon.com/gp/produGetting ct/1600850235/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER)

But I still have a few remaining mysteries:
  1. What are "window glaze" and "window putty", neither of which I can find anywhere? Can I just use silicone caulk to set the glass in and seal it to the stops?
  2. What size/shape of "resilient setting block" do I need (I'm finding neoprene ones online)? This is something that apparently goes under the pane to cushion it.
  3. How are the setting blocks installed?
  4. How much of a gap if any should I plan on around the glass, which I assume will expand, not to mention expansion of the wood frame?
  5. Do I need a particular kind/thickness of glass?
 
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Old 02-20-13, 04:29 AM
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What are "window glaze" and "window putty", neither of which I can find anywhere? Can I just use silicone caulk to set the glass in and seal it to the stops? Window glaze or putty in the same as glazing compound. You can use a siliconized latex caulk which is easier to apply when sealing to a stop.

What size/shape of "resilient setting block" do I need (I'm finding neoprene ones online)? This is something that apparently goes under the pane to cushion it. Not necessary for single glazing in a wood frame.

How are the setting blocks installed? If you do use them, they must be thickness of the glass and you make an allowance for that on the glass size.

How much of a gap if any should I plan on around the glass, which I assume will expand, not to mention expansion of the wood frame? Depending on the with of the stops, 1/16" to 1/8".

Do I need a particular kind/thickness of glass? Double Strength window glass (1/8") or 3/16" if you prefer a heavier glass (depends on size of glass). Being in Florida, you might consider Low-E glass to reflect heat.
 
  #21  
Old 04-01-13, 06:43 PM
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How much of a gap if any should I plan on around the glass, which I assume will expand, not to mention expansion of the wood frame? Depending on the with of the stops, 1/16" to 1/8".
Thanks for all the great advice. I'm not seeing tho how the width of the stops affects the spacing around the outside edge of the glass. Or did you mean a gap between the glass and the stops? I kind of figured the stops would butt right up against the glass. No?
 
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Old 04-03-13, 12:55 AM
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I'm refering to the part of the frame that the glass sits against. If that is at least 3/8" then you can make your glass 1/8" less than the opening and still have 1/4" of glass against that stop.
 
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