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Basement window fixing, adhesive?


fastmodena's Avatar
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01-05-13, 12:59 PM   #1  
Basement window fixing, adhesive?

We had our home built in August. Now I am starting to finish my basement but noticed the windows down there are not sealed properly. So I am sealing them and the second one I noticed is not sealed but also loose.

The windows are 4x4 in poured concrete foundation. There is no metal or wood frames just concrete notches that the windows are sealed to. They are not screwed to the foundation in any way and not really any room to screw them into the foundation.

I can push on the upper right hand of the window an inch or 2 to the outside. The windows can not be pushed to the inside because of the concrete notch.

It seems like a silicone type adhesive was used in each corner of the window between the vinyl window and concrete. What kind of adhesive should I use in the corner to fix this?

You can see from the pictures of what is currently in place.

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Size:  28.3 KBInside

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Size:  28.3 KBOutside, This is the corner that I can push on the window cause this silicone type stuff is not affixed anymore.

 
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XSleeper's Avatar
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01-05-13, 01:06 PM   #2  
Silicone isn't what I'd choose to use. Probably the best sealant I've used on concrete is Sonolastic NP1. It tools really nicely. If you have large gaps, these could be filled with foam backer rod so that you don't just pump a bunch of caulk in to the gap.

Tremco Dymonic is also good. A little creamier than I like, I find it harder to tool.

 
fastmodena's Avatar
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01-05-13, 01:39 PM   #3  
Would those actually bind the window like glue so that it won't move away from the concrete?

 
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01-05-13, 01:54 PM   #4  
Yes, that's why I suggested them.

 
Darren Graham's Avatar
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01-05-13, 07:09 PM   #5  
first of all, the windows are not installed correctly. taking the time to pull, clean, and re-install wouldnt be the worst idea on the world. Sonolastic or Solar Seal 900 would be my choice as a sealant.

 
fastmodena's Avatar
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01-06-13, 08:55 AM   #6  
They definetely are not installed correctly. How would I go about doing that?

I was thinking tapcon screws into the concrete but these windows do not have anyplace for screws. I would have to drill through the frame of the window leaving the screws exposed.

How would you install them? The window would be easy to take out because the silcone crap they used can just be pulled off. It's not sticky or anything.

My thought: Tapcon screws to hold the window in place, along with Sonolastic. On the interior use low expanding foam to weather proof it. Sound right? I am finishing the basement myself and can do most of that including electrical and plumbing but I am brand new to windows!

 
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01-06-13, 05:31 PM   #7  
do these windows vent? its possible the windows were field glazed. very unlikely, but possible.

 
fastmodena's Avatar
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01-07-13, 07:48 AM   #8  
I dont't think so.

They are made by Cascade Windows. They were ordered from the local lumber shop and dropped off in the garage just before the house was completely framed. I just thought windows would be installed correctly. Again never trust it fully unless you know for sure who is doing it or DIY!

 
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01-07-13, 08:11 AM   #9  
.


yep.....it appears as if this wasn't a very worthy install.

Hard to tell but it almost looks as though it's a flush mount window that has a nailing flange on the outside with an integrated J-channel meant for siding. If so, then it's supposed to be surface nailed through the exterior sheathing of a wood framed wall. This would make it the wrong type of window for this scenario and explain why they couldn't fasten it through the jamb.


.

 
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01-07-13, 03:25 PM   #10  
HALTON: What you said makes perfect sense. I honestly thing these are the wrong windows for this application. However that does not mean they wont work.

Few tapcons, better sealant than silicone, and low expanding foam will do the trick. The only downside is the tapcons will be visible in the 4 corners of the inside track of the window. Doesn't bother me and will save replacing these brand new things!

 
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01-07-13, 04:06 PM   #11  
I think you could possibly have a mess on your hands if you use expanding foam, so I wouldn't advise that. The "foam backer rod" that I mentioned comes in long rolls, you can get it in various sizes, and that is what I'd suggest you use to fill any gaps prior to recaulking anything that has a wide gap.

If you could provide us with a better closeup picture of the inside (where you are thinking about installing screws), we might see something else you could do with the screws. The light coming in the window kind of blinds us from seeing any detail on the interior edges of the frame.

 
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