What Kind of Door Should I Use?

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  #1  
Old 01-21-13, 06:52 PM
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What Kind of Door Should I Use?

I am a new home owner with no experience with installing doors at all. I have a finished basement and within the basement there's a doorway that houses my Central Air furnace. The doorway is bare and it is very unsightly to say the least. I would like to cover it up but it appears to be too wide for a typical door to work. I could use a sheet or curtain but that would look just as bad in my opinion. I would like some type of sliding door of some sort but I have no idea where to start. The doorway measurement is 36.5 x 80.5. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 01-21-13, 07:11 PM
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First off, where does the heater get it's air from? There should be a furnace filter located somewhere on the furnace. The intake air is filtered air. I just want you to make sure that you have ducted intake air coming from somewhere else (cold air returns) because occasionally furnaces will need to have makeup air coming from the doorway.

Assuming your heater has ducted intake air and that it is okay to put a door on this opening, I would suggest that you yank the existing casing and jambs, and just buy yourself a prehung 36" door that comes with it's own jamb, door and hinges. Once you install it, you would put new casing on to trim it out.

If you don't want a hinged door, you could install bifold doors. But you will probably still want a new door jamb that is 36" wide. You'd have some pretty big gaps around the bifolds since the opening is 36 1/2".

A sliding door (pocket door) would involve a lot of demolition along with a new header and I doubt you're up for that.

Furnaces almost always need "some" makeup air, so you may need to have it checked out by an HVAC technician who can tell you what it's needs are. Or if you have a manual, maybe you can look it up. Otherwise, let us know what model you have, and maybe someone here can figure out what it would need for fresh air ventilation.... you may need to cut a louver (or install a grille) onto the new door.
 
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Old 01-21-13, 07:41 PM
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vented bi-fold doors. add some clear 1x and Bob's your Uncle.
 
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Old 01-22-13, 03:10 PM
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Th bi-fold doors are a excellent idea! I should have thought of that considering that there are already 2 bi-fold doors in the room to begin with.
Do you think I would have to take down the header just to install a bi-fold door?
Taking down the header would certainly look better though as to match the other doors.
I have also included the S/N of the furnace as well as model so that should help.
Are bi-fold doors fairly easy to install?
Let me know what you guys think. Thanks again.

I'm also assuming that this door would work just fine considering my doorway measurements are 36.5 x 80.5.

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Last edited by Bekrah; 01-22-13 at 03:25 PM.
  #5  
Old 01-22-13, 03:54 PM
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I would go for a vented door. Most gas appliances require ambient air for combustion unless they are the high efficiency type with two PVC pipes for vents. The manual will state how many square feet you'll need, by installing a vented door, you'll ensure it has enough breathable air.
 
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Old 01-22-13, 04:08 PM
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A louvered bifold would be my preference too. I'd replace the existing jamb (sides and top). So that you have a finished opening that's exactly 36 x 80 1/2. This doesn't involve a new header. But you will want to put new casing on. Casing generally is stepped back from the edge of the jamb by 1/4", it isn't installed flush with the edges of the jamb.
 
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Old 01-22-13, 04:58 PM
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Ok thanks for the replies guys. How would I go about removing the door jamb without destroying the opening? I'm new to all this stuff. Would special tools be required in order to do so? Installing the actual bi-fold door seems as if it would be a easy job, at least that's what I gather from looking at how the other ones in my house are installed.
 
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Old 01-22-13, 08:38 PM
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I think all you'd need is a prybar and a hammer. Casing first, then sides (starting from the back side of the bottom first) I'm assuming that the bare wood on the finished opening is a 1x4 or 1x6??? Looks like the 1x lumber that our Menard's tries to sell. Those knots don't look like 2x4's...

Just making sure before we give you the thumbs up to start ripping into it! LOL


Tools to put the new jamb together? maybe a drill, a countersink and some screws? To set it in the rough opening you'd want a pack of cedar shims... and a few 10d finish nails and a nail set. A 78" level would be good to plumb the jamb legs, and a 32" level would be good to ensure the floor that the legs sit on is level. Since the floor is carpet, the jambs will need to sit right on the floor and can't be shimmed up, so to keep the head jamb level one leg may need to be cut longer than the other if the floor is a bit out of level.
 
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