putting a window in a wall


  #1  
Old 02-05-13, 05:11 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
putting a window in a wall

Hello, everyone!

I am going to put an insulated picture window in a wall of my house that has no window now. I think I've figured out how to do the framing but there are a couple of things I am unsure about:

On the other side of the insulation shown in the interior wall picture, there is plywood and then aluminum siding outside of that. What is the best way to cut through both of them? I've gotten different opinions from asking around locally: some say use a circular saw, some say use a cutting wheel on a Dremel or similar tool, some say use a reciprocating saw. My main concern is getting a straight, clean cut on the aluminum siding.

Also, it seems like I could frame everything from the inside before cutting through the plywood and siding on the outside. Am I right or wrong about that?

Attached is a picture of the interior wall with a cut out of the drywall (I wanted to see what was behind the wall before going any further). The red line is the outline of the actual window size and the two blue lines are the locations of the nearest wall studs behind the drywall. Also attached is a picture of the window, a picture of the exterior wall, and a framing diagram that shows what I will need to do (except I have a brick wall for a base).


Name:  Laventure Window Opening.jpg
Views: 2969
Size:  24.0 KBName:  3150 Laventure Drive 002.jpg
Views: 1766
Size:  35.7 KBName:  3150 Laventure Drive 008.jpg
Views: 1608
Size:  22.0 KBName:  Framing a Window Rough Opening.jpg
Views: 25046
Size:  37.2 KB
 

Last edited by botanica; 02-05-13 at 05:34 PM.
  #2  
Old 02-05-13, 07:26 PM
Tolyn Ironhand's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: United States
Posts: 14,400
Received 895 Upvotes on 756 Posts
I will let the pros help you on the window.

I will mention you will need to refeed the receptacle to the left of the window, or fish in a new one to keep your 12' code requirement.
 
  #3  
Old 02-05-13, 08:26 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,200
Received 1,948 Upvotes on 1,748 Posts
Well, a couple things first off. The window you have pictured appears to be a replacement window (meant to fit inside an existing window jamb) not a new construction-ready window, which has a nailing fin. Unless I'm missing something, that's problem number one when it comes to the installation of your particular window.

As for the rough opening, you will need to select one stud on each side (blue lines?) that will remain in their current location, and the header will go between them. Trimmers are studs that are added to support the header on each end, and they go from the bottom of the header all the way down to the sill plate. All that framing can't usually be done without removing more drywall from the wall than what you currently have removed.

As Tolyn pointed out, the electrical may be an issue. If that outlet left of the window is the last one on the line it won't be a big deal to disconnect it and run it below the window to a new location. But if it continues on to power more outlets, then you will probably be adding additional outlets below the window, which is the best way to splice that line. This also may mean opening up more drywall (and the faux? brick) than what you may have imagined.

Assuming all that can be done and you can complete the rough opening framing entirely from the inside, I would say that the best way to cut the siding would be by drilling a hole through each corner of the rough opening (from the inside) and then go around to the outside and connect those holes with a pencil and a straightedge. A skilsaw with a cheap carbide blade or a 4 1/2" grinder with a 1/16" abrasive blade would be best. A reciprocating saw would work if you were cutting from the inside, but you would need someone outside to hold the siding back tightly so it doesn't shake. It also won't cut as straight of a line as the 2 previously mentioned tools.

After the siding is cut out to the size of the RO, you would be able to install the window out flush to the sheathing, shim and secure it with screws. Assuming you don't have a nail fin (and can't get one) you would only be able to slap face trim over the window to seal the exterior. So that would mean cutting the siding again, based on the width of your trim (whatever it may be) and how it will lay on the window. So if you have 2" wide trim, figure out how much of it will overlap onto the window and also where the outside edge of it will be by measuring away from the window and mark the siding again, and cut it a 2nd time. After you've done that on all 4 sides, you will want to cap the cut edge of the siding with a j-channel, which can simply slip over the cut edge and sit there until you put the trim on, which will trap the j-channel in place.

Installing a window this way is problematic because it relies completely on the caulk joint between the window and the trim to prevent leaks. Replacement windows with no nailing fin really should not be installed in the manner you intend.
 
  #4  
Old 02-06-13, 06:22 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Thank you for the responses.

I know that the drywall needs to be cut out more, and about the header and framing. I only made a smaller cut in the drywall just to see what was behind the wall before going any further.

I believe that the wiring for the two outlets comes in from the left of the window. I will probably just eliminate the one on the right.

Yes, it does look like a replacement window and I suppose a window with a nailing fin on the outside would be ideal. But this is what I have to work with. Maybe I can improvise something out of sheet aluminum to take the place of a nailing fin that would better seal the outside.

I do need to figure out how to do the trim work on the outside. Your comments about that are helpful.
 
  #5  
Old 02-06-13, 06:52 AM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,200
Received 1,948 Upvotes on 1,748 Posts
For your trim, the absolute best thing you could do is use 1" thick PVC trim, rip it to the width you want on a table saw, rip a bevel on the interior edge that will overlap onto the window (like 15) so that once you assemble it, the trim bevels away from the window on all 4 sides... this will act as a sloped sill on the bottom so that water doesn't sit on a flat ledge. Then get yourself some Trimbonder (made by Devcon) and use it as the caulk where the window and the trim meet. Its a white epoxy and will seal the window and the PVC together so that it won't leak. You could use another type of sealant, I'm just telling you what would be best and longest lasting.
 
  #6  
Old 02-06-13, 05:42 PM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
For your trim, the absolute best thing you could do is use 1" thick PVC trim, rip it to the width you want on a table saw, rip a bevel on the interior edge that will overlap onto the window (like 15) so that once you assemble it, the trim bevels away from the window on all 4 sides... this will act as a sloped sill on the bottom so that water doesn't sit on a flat ledge. Then get yourself some Trimbonder (made by Devcon) and use it as the caulk where the window and the trim meet. Its a white epoxy and will seal the window and the PVC together so that it won't leak. You could use another type of sealant, I'm just telling you what would be best and longest lasting.
I've read through that a few times but I'm still not getting a clear picture of it in my head. I'm going to take my pictures and some of your suggestions to a local building supply company that does a lot with windows, doors, and siding. Maybe they will be able to help me figure this out. I have done replacement windows in the past but I have never cut an opening in a wall and installed a window. I know I can do it if I get enough advice and plan it carefully.

Thanks for the advice. I might be back for more!
 
  #7  
Old 02-09-13, 11:08 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the rough opening should be a little larger than the actual window size because I will need some space for adjustments with shims to make things square and level, even though this is a fixed 4' X 4' picture window, so I don't have to be concerned with sashes operating properly. That being the case, how much larger should the rough opening be than the window that is going inside of it?
 
  #8  
Old 02-09-13, 03:27 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 27,200
Received 1,948 Upvotes on 1,748 Posts
Yes, you're right about that. Generally a rough opening is 3/4" to 1" larger than the size of the window being installed in it. You'll shim the bottom of the rough opening to provide a 1/2" gap, then set the window on those shims. Usually you want the shims near the corners of the windows (where most of the downward thrust of weight is) and a few in between to keep the bottom straight and level. Then a few on the sides. Shims on top are usually unnecessary.

Having a gap that size allows you to better insulate the frame. It's hard to properly insulate a tight space with very little gap.
 
  #9  
Old 02-11-13, 10:05 AM
B
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: USA
Posts: 5
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
OK, I'll try to keep it to no more than 1/2" on each side.

Thanks.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: