Broken in door- split wood

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Old 03-27-13, 02:58 PM
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Broken in door- split wood

I'm renovating this house and I'm at the door stage and trying to avoid going out to purchase a new one... I would need some advice as to how I could get the door sealed back together, will some wood glue and clamps (to keep it together) do the trick? And afterwords, if the glue takes could I use wood filler to finish up nicely?

Any suggestions are welcomed.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 03:37 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

You could try glue and clamps but I don't know that you'll ever get it as strong as it once was. It will be easier to fix it cosmetically than structurally. I think I'd bite the bullet and replace the door, you could always fix and save that one for a shed if you don't want to toss it.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 03:48 PM
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Thanks Mark, just found out about these forums today. They are great.

I think you're right, unless somebody else has a magic solution, I'll try the glue and clamps since I already have them in the garage and if not we'll have to order in a new one.

Do you have any experience with wood filler? Should I go with the putty or filler?

Thanks,
G
 
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Old 03-27-13, 03:52 PM
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Most any type of filler will do ok since it would only be cosmetic. I'd probably use whatever I had on hand. A sandable filler can be made to look nicer but even caulking would do ok.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 04:00 PM
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Great, thanks for you input Mark.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 04:03 PM
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I guess the deadbolt wasn't in use at the time of forced entry. I don't think that you will have much luck restoring the full integrity of the door with glue. You can give the "gorilla type" glues a try, but keep in mind that they expand quite a bit as they cure. I would use blocks of wood on either side of the door and a lot of clamps to hold it while it sets up. Worth a try, and cheaper than a replacement. Might buy you some time while you save up for a new replacement.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 04:16 PM
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You can buy just the door slab, which is what I'd suggest, rather than replacing the entire prehung unit, and that's what I'd recommend you do. That door is toast. Any repair would be temporary at best.
 
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Old 03-27-13, 04:37 PM
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Hi
Look into A door sleeve. You need to know thickness of the door (1 3/4),
back set of locks (2 3/8) and distance on center between locks (3 5/8) the 3 5/8 can be fudged.
Good Luck Woodbutcher
 
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Old 03-27-13, 05:08 PM
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Thanks Woodbutcher, I hadn't thought of the reinforcement sleeves. Might be a good idea in this case!
 
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Old 03-27-13, 05:24 PM
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When wood splits like that the good thing is it is all there. In other words, when clamped together it may go right back into place. The trick is to force the glue into every bit of the break you can. I will sometimes drill small holes out near the end of s crack so the glue can get to the break better. The small holes fill easily, I'm talking 1/8" size.

For the glue, I have had good success with the two part epoxy, the type that comes in a syringe with two cylinders. I like the 5 minute version, but you need to be sure you mix enough and have everything ready to clamp once the glue is in place. I believe they also offer a 45 minute version, but I would be sure to let it set overnight.

As for clamping, as suggested, clamp the whole length of the door so it sets straight. As for strength, if you get the glue to all surfaces, it is stronger than original, I've tested it.

If you have a regular wood glue, they will also do well, jut takes longer to dry and they do not fill in holes as well. But, being slow to harden will give you more working time. I have used the point of a knife to carefully open cracks to force the glue in.

Goof luck and let us know how you do.
Bud
 
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Old 03-27-13, 05:37 PM
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Thanks for your advice Bud, this was very useful. I will be using Titebond III and bunch of clamps, I will make sure to let you all know how I make out.

G
 
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Old 03-27-13, 08:17 PM
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I will be using Titebond III and bunch of clamps, I will make sure to let you all know how I make out.
Set the clamps just tight enough to pull everything into line. If you make them tighter than that you start to force the glue out of the crack, which will result in a weaker repair.
 
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Old 03-28-13, 04:48 AM
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Be sure to use a longer straight piece of wood and I like to use wax paper or something the glue will not stick to just in case the glue runs.

Bud
 
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