Slanted window - should I correct?

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  #1  
Old 04-08-13, 11:11 AM
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Slanted window - should I correct?

I had someone installed an aluminum window that's 60" wide by 48" tall. The window is composed of a top pane and bottom pane. The bottom is just fixed glass, the top is a horizontal sliding window. This window is located INSIDE a shower and facing an interior privacy courtyard.

I hired a window installer to install it several months ago and at the time I didn't see any problem.

Now that I am getting ready to install cement boards around the shower area walls, and putting up wood furrings around the edges of the window I see a problem. The right edge of the window is not plumb. The left edge seem to be OK.

Now the operation of the window is OK, the top window does slide back and forth OK. My concern is whether this will cause a problem when tiling later. The top edge of the window is out of plumb but about an inch. That's quite a bit over 48" of length right? It's visually noticeable.

This is from the outside. You can see the top edge is slightly narrower than the bottom edge.



Now look at the inside, the top right:



The bottom right:



If I attach a piece of 1x4 along this vertical edge and set it to plumb you can see the top is over an inch from the window edge, where the bottom is touching.







and if I put a level against it you can see the 1x4 is plumb.



I think this much difference when I attach a strip of cement board over it then tile, the top edge has to be cut a whole inch wider this is going to be a problem.

Should I forget about it or should I reset the window right now?

I called the window installer and he said it's "within tolerance" and shouldn't be a problem and have no desire to come and fix it.

I looked around the frame and there are screws along the metal track I assume I can remove and "free" the top and right edge. I am hoping I don't need to move the left and bottom edges just the top and right edges.

He used drywall screws to attach the window frame to the PT lumber behind it. I thought this is a NO NO and should use ACQ rated screws?

The problem I see is there is quite a bit of adhesive/sealant around the edges on the inside and outside, I don't know how I can free the edges with this much adhesive. They have hardened and not going to be easy to take it apart.

Appreciate any advice.
 
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  #2  
Old 04-08-13, 03:56 PM
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I don't quite understand from your post what the installer framed, and what was already there. I've been a window installer for 20+ years, and have had to put windows into all sorts of crooked walls, and sometimes you just have to do the best you can with what you have to work with.

What I'm getting at is, what sort of an opening was the installer working with, prior to the installation of the window? He mounted the window in the cement opening, I take it. So take your level outside the wall and check that wall on both sides. I am betting he just went with the exterior plane of the wall.

It's very possible that if you measure your wall thickness, (from the outside plane of the wall to the inside plane of the wall, that you have 4 different measurements at each of the 4 corners. That's pretty common.

Normally you would be right, that a window should be installed plumb, but if that would mean that one corner of the window would be sticking out beyond the outside 1"... that probably wouldn't be acceptable either.

So I don't really have an answer for you. Theoretically, yes... both sides of the window should be plumb. Sealant can be cut with a linoleum knife or if there is enough clearance (and you're careful) you could use a thin blade in a sawzall.
 
  #3  
Old 04-08-13, 05:05 PM
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Thanks. It is not plumb to the outside wall or the inside wall.

The first picture shows the outside wall and the window and you can see the space between the window corners to the outside plane of the exterior wall the top edge is narrower than the bottom edge.

On the inside, I put up a 1x4 just as an illustration and set it to be flushed with the edge of the wall again, and shows the upper edge to be 1" further out then the lower edge.

The exterior wall surface is plumb for the most part, but irregularities of the stucco made it difficult.

The interior face of the concrete wall is also plumb.

The only thing that is not plumb is the window frame. The problem is it's obvious it's crooked visually, and only on the right side.
 

Last edited by MiamiCuse; 04-08-13 at 05:29 PM.
  #4  
Old 04-08-13, 08:22 PM
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Well, try your best to get him to come back and look at it... It most certainly "is not within tolerances" if the walls are plumb and the window is not.
 
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