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How to install storm door on door with sidelight

How to install storm door on door with sidelight


  #1  
Old 06-15-13, 11:40 AM
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How to install storm door on door with sidelight

Hi Everyone,

I saw a couple of threads on this particular issue but I just wasn't able to follow them without the aid of a few pictures. I'm hoping that you folks can point me in the right direction.

I have an entry door with a side light. The hinge side of the door extends out far enough that installing the storm door will be no problem. Where the door needs to latch, however, does not extend out nearly far enough to attach the storm door. What exactly do I buy to remedy this situation so I can install the door? I've attached some pictures and with your assistance I'll make sure to add more so folks who are experiencing similar problems can get a visual. There are literally NO pictures out there for resolving this. Thanks in advance for any advice you can give!

Sincerely,

Ben

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  #2  
Old 06-15-13, 12:10 PM
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You'll need to extend the latch side out with 2 pieces of wood. One to replicate the dimensions of the existing jamb and extending out to the edge of the upper jamb. A second piece slightly smaller in width to provide the same reveal as you see between existing frame and brickmold. These will need to be beveled on the bottom to match the metal threshold.

You will need a table saw to make these pieces. Not sure how you handle the flat cut edge mating up with the slightly rounded edge of the existing jamb.

You will need to attach the first piece using deeply countersunk screws, then the second piece with countersunk screws or construction adhesive and finish nails (I've seen it both ways).

When I used to sell doors like this, it was always an option to have storm door extensions factory installed and I highly recommended them, even if they weren't getting a storm right then.
 
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Old 06-15-13, 12:18 PM
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Thanks for the advice! It was a foreclosure so we got what we paid for I guess The rounded part is what I was wondering about. I wonder if I just slap some wood filler in that gap, smooth it, and paint it if it'll come out alright. Probably not a today job then but I'll be sure to come back with more pics when I start working!
 
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Old 06-15-13, 12:59 PM
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I'm sure one of our real carpenters will come in later with more advice. Check back in a few hours.
 
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Old 06-15-13, 01:45 PM
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Vic was correct in his direction.

As far as the rounded corner, you do not want to use wood filler. This will be a somewhat dynamic joint and will see movement. I would put on my best caulking hat and carefully fill it in with flexible caulking that is paintable. Remember, this will be on the inside of the two doors and not visible from the outside. The outside can be further trimmed out to obscure the multiple layers. The trim with the storm door will cover most of the addition. If after completing, the door does not seem solid enough on the latch side, you may have to drive a couple of long screw through the whole sandwich from storm trim to original wood.
 
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Old 06-15-13, 02:09 PM
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Just thought of something...seems like some of the guys that did our work installed a piece of screen molding over the bevel joint?

I imagine if that was well done all around the frame, it would look pretty good. Like it came from the factory that way. Pretty cheap and easy with a brad nailer. Of course, finding enough straight pieces will be the hard part...lol.

Oh...and when you do the job, be sure to at a minimum prime the cut ends of the wood. Once in place it will be too late. After install, a clear caulk can be used at the bottom...not really needed at the top.
 
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Old 06-15-13, 04:53 PM
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The caulking makes sense. I wasn't thinking about it moving at all but with it connecting with the storm door that definitely makes sense. Shouldn't be too hard of an adaptation. Hopefully it won't look too wonky.
 
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Old 06-15-13, 05:44 PM
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wonky
/ˈwNGkē/
Adjective

Crooked; off-center; askew.
(of a thing) Unsteady; shaky: "sitting on wonky stools".

Synonyms
shaky - rickety - wobbly
Give the center stile a quick rub with sandpaper to remove the paint. Add a little wood glue between layers as you build out the wood to the correct depth. The glue will help add rigidity so it won't be "wonky"

But the key is to make sure you use long enough screws to grab everything together. It is also OK to drill and counter sink and plug some screw from the inside to secure as well. Just make sure everything stays clear of the glass in your sidelite.
 
 

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