Moving my front door

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  #1  
Old 09-15-13, 09:28 PM
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Moving my front door

I have a really strange set up for my front door to my house. When they built the house (modular ranch home), they decided to recess the front door about 2 feet or so. The downside to that is that there is about 2 feet deept by about 5.5 feet wide of "subfloor" that is basically exposed to the elements.

That being said, I HATE the way that it looks and I am trying to do something to make it look better. At first I was thinking of tiling it, but I don't think I have the height to tile it. So the next option, and probably the better option, is to move the door out flush which is where it should have been to begin with.

Based on the attached pictures, would it be as simple as taking out the door, framing it up (without even removing the siding, etc), insulating and drywalling it and calling it a day?







 
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Old 09-16-13, 05:03 AM
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I can't believe they left that plywood exposed that way. I think it might be easier to deal with the floor somehow, tile or slate. That door looks to me like a storm door and I don't see any other door behind it. I would definitely change that door whatever you do.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 05:52 AM
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Yea, terrible design IMO. I have actually already replaced that plywood section once since I have been in the house. There is actually an entryway door, you just can't see it in the pictures because it is open and swings to the right.

The issue I have with tiling is that there is only a gap of about 3/4 of an inch (I think a little less) when I swing open that storm door so by the time you add cement board, thinset, potentially a waterproof membrane and the tile I am not sure if there is enough room.

So I was hoping I could just frame it up and move the door flush without much demo at all. Since the door has one of those little side windows, it takes up almost the whole opening anyway. There is about 4 inches on both sides of the door so that leaves just enough to frame it up I believe.

EDIT: What about moving just the storm door? I could frame out an area just for a storm door creating a small mud room for shoes and stuff before entering the house. The downside is that it would be a waste of that side window on the front door and I might have to put in some windows as well so I could still open the front door and let in light.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 06:57 AM
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What is below the wood. Is it a basement? Even if basement I'd consider reconfiguring the joists so I could pour at least a 3" concrete slab.

What about moving just the storm door? I could frame out an area just for a storm door creating a small mud room for shoes and stuff before entering the house.
Not sure why that would affect the light if it was a ful view storm dorr. Seems like it would get plenty of light. But you could build a custom side light from scratch on one side of the storm door.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 07:46 AM
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Yes, that plywood is essentially the subfloor. If I pull that section of plywood I would see the joists. I think trying to reconfigure the joists and having a concrete slab poured is a much bigger job than I want to take on/pay for. We won't be in this house too much longer if I have my way anyway.

My concern with the light was right now I can open up the front door and have light coming in the storm door and the side window. If I moved the storm door out and built a wall around the storm door, the opening would only be 36" wide instead of the 36" plus the width of the side window if you follow what I am saying.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 08:02 AM
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Maybe you could get by with something like this over the plywood.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 08:08 AM
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That is something that could potentially work. Certainly still a "band-aid solution but it is cheap and can always be removed down the road fairly easily. I guess my concern would be how well it would hold up to the crappy weather we get in Upstate NY.

That area doesn't get pounded with rain/snow since it is covered, but depending on the direction of the rain/snow it can get wet or snow piled up on it.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 09:06 AM
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My concern with the light was right now I can open up the front door and have light coming in the storm door and the side window. If I moved the storm door out and built a wall around the storm door, the opening would only be 36"
But why can't it be wider with a storm door and sidelight. A sidelight isn't that hard to build. Basicly just a wall with a large hole for a pane of glass.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 09:25 AM
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I could do something like that, I just have never "built" my own window before so I am not sure how to rough it in or anything.
 
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Old 09-16-13, 10:49 AM
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Rough it out including the opening with 2x4s. Put sheathing and vinyl siding on one side and Sheetrock on the other. Rip clear 1x6 to the total width from face of siding to face of Sheetrock. Use it to make a squared rectangular jamb in the opening. Trim out the jamb on the inside and outside. Install a piece of plate glass in the opening held by quarter round or step molding on both sides.

You can put the outside trim on the sheathing not the siding and but the siding to the trim. Best to use a drip cap under the sheathing or the siding.

I have done it with no sheathing or siding using panels made of 1" foam sandwiched between two pieces of 3/8" plywood. Again you start with a 2x4 frame but just leave openings for the panels and glass . Use clear 1x4s for the jambs and rip clear 1bys to width wide enough to cover both the 2x4 edge and jamb edge. Install the panel(s) the same way you do the glass.
 
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Old 09-17-13, 07:08 PM
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You could pull out the existing door/ sidelite unit then replace the subfloor from under the door to the outside edge, using a product like Structure wood. Install a strip of 3/4 structure wood where the door sill is then install the door. You may need to cut the header a bit to make it fit. Then install ditra mat or similar on the floor and up under the siding 6" or so then install tile on the floor.
 
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