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Getting (new) straight trim to fit a sagging bay window

Getting (new) straight trim to fit a sagging bay window

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  #1  
Old 09-21-13, 10:39 AM
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Getting (new) straight trim to fit a sagging bay window

We have a couple of big bay windows we are replacing the trim on and we ran into an issue when we tried to fit the new top trim back in. It turns that over time the house has sagged over the bay window and the original trim bent with it. When we put the replacement trim back in place, it was too straight to fit without looking out of wack, either in the middle or the sides.

We attacked the first window, which is about 12 feet wide, a few months ago and we ended up getting a handyman/carpenter to help us get the top piece of trim in place. Unfortunately I was not here when he did it so I did not get to really observe his technique, but according to my wife he used an oval shim of some type that looked like a football with the ends cut off behind the trim to get it to bend somehow.

We are now attempting to replace the trim on the second, smaller bay window (about 9 feet wide) and the window and top piece of trim have the same issue -- sag over time has bent the top part of the window and the new trim is too straight to fit.

Unfortunately we cannot get in touch with the carpenter who solved this problem on the first window and so my question to the experts here is -- do you know anything about the technique or trick he might have used to get the trim to fit (using a shim)? I think it might have involved placing the shim behind the trim at the center, nailing the trim in at the center and then somehow bending the ends into place and nailing them, but this just doesn't seem like it would work...

Any help would be greatly appreciated. From what my wife said, the carpenter described it as a very simple trick and (she thinks) it did not involve any modifications or cuts to the trim to allow it to bend.

For reference, it is 1x3 select pine we are dealing with here.

Thanks in advance,

Gabe
 
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  #2  
Old 09-21-13, 12:10 PM
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You should be able to get quite a bit of flex out of a 1x3 piece of pine that is 12' long. I must be missing something. Can you post a picture that better details the issue? Are you using regular nails or a pneumatic nailer?
 
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Old 09-22-13, 05:44 AM
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I realize you only need a quick fix, but I question why the windows are sagging to the point that molding must be forced to trim the frame. The rough cut opening should've been corrected before the new windows were installed to fix the sagging problem.
 
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Old 09-22-13, 06:14 AM
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I'm not quite sure I understand your goal here. You want the new trim to fit the crooked jamb on top of the window? That doesn't really make sense to me.

If the head of the bay (bow?) window is not longer straight, I would think that removing the trim, removing any shims and then reshimming it so that the jamb was straight again would not be that hard.

At any rate, it sounds like the carpenter used a biscuit jointer and biscuits, which would help the trim follow the jamb and keep the reveals even.
 
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Old 09-22-13, 06:15 AM
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We have a couple of big bay windows we are replacing the trim on
They are replacing trim on existing windows, they are not new windows.
 
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Old 09-22-13, 06:53 AM
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Yea, I mis-read that. Oops.
 
  #7  
Old 09-26-13, 09:35 AM
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Been There, Done That

Judging by the fact that it's a problem with the top trim only, I'd say what is sagging is a substandard header. If not corrected, it can end up breaking the window. I've seen it before. It's a job for a real carpenter, not a trick to get you by.
I can go into detail if provided with info on interior and exterior wall materials e.g., paneling, plaster, T-111, stucco, etc.
 
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