Window Problems - COLD!

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  #1  
Old 09-26-13, 07:37 AM
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Window Problems - COLD!

I am hoping someone might be able to provide me with some help on how to help with drafty windows. The windows in question are single hung Crestline windows (white vinyl on the inside and outside) installed by our builder about seven years ago when we had our house built. Our house has 2x6 walls , vinyl siding and did have a house wrap if that matters at all. The builder has since gone bankrupt so I can no longer contact them. We did contact Crestline directly a number of years ago and they sent out a service rep who said it was a framing issue and did do some caulking around the inside of the frames.
I expressed to the builder at the time that I did not want these windows but they stated this is the only windows they offered. Anyway, now we are stuck with bad windows. On cold days during winter, a noticable breeze can be felt coming in around all windows (in some places the breeze is strong enough to extinguish a lighter).
Unfortunately we can't afford new windows at this time. However, I would like to do whatever possible on a very limitied budget to improve their efficiency. Any tips/advice/suggestions will be greatly appreciated!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-26-13, 07:59 AM
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No storm windows for the winter/cold months? They could help greatly.

You could carefully remove the inside trim around the window and see if there is access to the area between the window and the framing. - If there is a space, get a can or two of foam ( few bucks) made for windows and doors and fill the void between the framing and the window. If there is fiberglass in the void, get rid of the junk before foaming. Trim off the excess foam and replace the trim you saved.

Dick
 
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Old 09-26-13, 08:21 AM
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There are no storm windows (windows didn't come with them)....can they be installed now? How does this work?

Unfortunately the only wood around the windows is a wood ledge. The rest of the area around the windows is framed with drywall (the windows are set "into" the drivewall since we have 2x6 walls). I did notice a gap under the wood ledge that wasn't insulated when I was dealing with ant problem this past summer (I can take pictures tonight when I get home). Should that be filled with foam?
 
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Old 09-26-13, 03:52 PM
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The only way to go about this is to remove the drywall jambs on the interior, then do as Dick suggested to insulate around the window. If that doesn't help then the window itself is to blame. Unfortunately, Crestline is IMO about the bottom of the barrel when it comes to window quality.
 

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  #5  
Old 09-26-13, 04:33 PM
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Post some pictures, inside and out.
How much play is there from side to side?
 
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Old 09-27-13, 11:58 AM
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Here are some pictures:

Caulk Crestline rep added:


Gap between sill and drywall (normally covered with moulding):





Weatherstripping between upper and lower sash:


Track that lower sash slides up and down on. To remove the lower sash you press this track in:














Weatherstripping along bottom of window:




 
  #7  
Old 02-06-14, 08:41 AM
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With the cold weather I've done some more investigation. It seems the windows are actually leaking between the sash and the window frame. I notice no drafts around the upper sash (non-movable....single hung) but air around all the "cracks" between the moving bottom sash and the frame. I also noticed that the gap between the frame and sash on the sides is not uniform from top to bottom. This suggests a framing issue I would imagine. Anyway, I can replace the weatherstripping on the bottom (I'm going to test with paper) bit what do I use on the sides and top? Is there some sort of weatherstripping that will work (they are vinyl so can't be nailed)? Can the tracks on the sides be adjusted? I tried the removable caulk but it did no work well (Isn't very soluble and just seemed to clump). Thanks!
 
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Old 02-06-14, 11:09 AM
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Take a tape measure and do some investigating. Measure the sash itself (the sash is the glass and the frame around it that holds the glass), measuring the width of the glass area at the top... middle... and bottom of the sash. I have seen some sashes that are "hourglassed" where the measurement across the middle was too narrow, which means the weatherstrip on the sides is not tight.

You can also measure the masterframe of the window (the jambs- the frame the sashes slide up and down in) in the same manner. Check it at the meeting rail, then where the center of the sash would be... then at the bottom. All those measurements should be the same- if it is bowed out in the center, it would also mean you don't have a tight seal for the weatherstrip.

If everything checks out as being straight (all sides are perfectly parallel with each other) then you just have to chalk it up to it being a low quality window. No window is perfectly tight- especially not tilt windows. In order to tilt in, they rely COMPLETELY on weatherstrip to keep air out. So that being said, if there is the slightest gap or maybe the weatherstrip has flattened itself out, then it's no longer being efficient at sealing the window. All windows have some air infiltration, and a certain amount is actually normal... or at least within the design limits of the window and it's AAMA window rating.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 11:10 AM
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Approved post with pics... should be viewable... Also deleted duplicate thread................
 
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Old 02-06-14, 11:35 AM
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Thanks to both of you. I believe the sashes have the "fuzzy" pile weatherstripping (I know on the bottom and I think on the sides and top). I know it's probably pretty worn but the windows have leaked since they were installed (seven years ago). Anyway, I am going to stop at Menards on the way home tonight......what kind of weatherstripping should I buy? Keep in mind that the windows are Crestline vinyl single hung. I figure replacing/upgrading the weatherstripping is the cheapest first step.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 11:57 AM
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I doubt that Menards is going to have what you need. The weatherstrip that is commonly used in windows is very specific in size and probably isn't something stores carry.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 12:05 PM
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Thanks! What is the name of the stuff I'm looking for and where can I order it from? Amazon maybe?
 
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Old 02-06-14, 12:11 PM
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Actually, I think I found it on amazon:

Amazon.com: window weatherstripping pile

How do I know though which is best and which pile height I need?
 
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Old 02-06-14, 12:16 PM
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Well, I can't exactly see what kind of weatherstripping you have from where I'm sitting... LOL... but generally the weatherstriping on windows will be a pile weatherstrip with plastic fin, and it slides into a t-slot in the vinyl extrusion.

https://www.google.com/search?q=pile...ih=754&dpr=0.9

There are many sizes, both backing and height. You about need a micrometer to figure out which one to get.

The thing is, your weatherstrip might be fine. That style of window is similar to a "tilt pack" and air can also come around behind the jamb liner. It's hard to say exactly what you need without being there to inspect it.

If you caulked the edge of the jamb liner with a temporary caulk, either rope caulk or DAP Seal-n-peel, and the wind still blew in... then you would know that it's coming between the sash and the jamb liner. I don't even know if there is weatherstrip there- you would have to tilt the window in and look. I don't see any photos of the sides of the sash when it is tilted in. So it's impossible for me to say exactly what you need.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 12:24 PM
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Thanks! I'll take some more pictures tonight when I get home. What should I actually take pictures of? I'm assuming a jamb liner is the track the sash slides up and down in? I do know that to remove the sash, I push this track in. I assume most single hung vinyl windows are like this but maybe I'm wrong.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 12:35 PM
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Yes, the jamb liner is the track that you push in. (left side, picture one, with the dent in the track) Almost no vinyl windows are built that way. Yours are actually the first I have seen. Marvin and others used to make wood sash tilt packs like that, maybe they still do.

Pictures of the side of the sash once it's tipped down (like you do when you want to clean the opposite side) so that we can see if there is actually any weatherstrip there. (6th picture down).

You will want to try and figure out #1 if the old weatherstrip can even be removed (sometimes on welded frames you actually have to cut the frame open to get it out, then glue the new weatherstrip in, which rarely works well). And #2 the width of the t-slot and the height of the pile.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 07:57 PM
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Here are some pictures I took tonight of the weatherstripping:
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:01 PM
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And here are a few more of the weatherstripping and sash:
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:28 PM
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Weatherstrip looks fine to me. I think you would be wasting time and effort to replace it and will probably do more harm than good.
 
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Old 02-06-14, 08:39 PM
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Another idea

I think the type of weather stripping in the attachment installed as shown will seal the sides from any air flow.
 
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Old 02-07-14, 06:00 AM
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Thanks guys. I think we've decided to just seal the windows with window film right now. I'm debating though whether to just apply the film directly to the frames with the tape or create interior storm windows with it. Applying it directly to the frame would definitely be easier and probably more efficient (better seal) but I'm not sure how it would work with the ledge (handle). The storm windows would be nice because I could use them multiple years, but would be more work initially and not as efficient. Thoughts?
 
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Old 02-07-14, 11:55 AM
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Whatever works for you is best.
 
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