Go Back  DoItYourself.com Community Forums > Interior Improvement Center > Doors, Skylights and Windows
Reload this Page >

Replacing windows when also planning to reside; new or replacement?

Replacing windows when also planning to reside; new or replacement?

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-01-13, 08:41 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Evansville, WI
Posts: 329
Replacing windows when also planning to reside; new or replacement?

We are planning on having our windows replaced and also at the same time getting the house resided. It seems like the major negative about new windows is the siding being in the way, with that not being a factor then, would new windows be cheaper to do, or me more efficient, or is it not realy that much better to do new windows? 2 windows have a brick facia around them, so that opens up a possible can of worms where those 2 might be better with replacements, they are n the front of our tri-level house.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-01-13, 10:08 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: WI/MN
Posts: 18,650
If you're removing material in front so getting to the nailing flange is easy, I'd go with new windows.

I agree, the two in brick are probably better addressed with replacements.
 
  #3  
Old 10-01-13, 10:55 AM
czizzi's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: USA
Posts: 7,174
The nice thing about replacement windows is there is little if any work that needs to be completed on the inside of the house. New construction would mean new trim inside and possibly some drywall work. Outside they would have to be flashed and taped.
 
  #4  
Old 10-01-13, 04:29 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,507
Another vote for new construction windows, w/nail fin.
 
  #5  
Old 10-01-13, 07:36 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Evansville, WI
Posts: 329
Thanks guys, I have been thinking about this for awhile, we really want a color change to the vinyl siding, so I was thinking there might be an efficiency benefit to using new installation rather than replacements as well.
Not sure why it would involve drywall or trim work, if new windows can be ordered custom size, to match what we have. Not sure if this is normally done or not.
 
  #6  
Old 10-01-13, 08:24 PM
XSleeper's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: USA
Posts: 20,507
They "can" be ordered to fit the trim, if you know how to measure correctly (it's usually inside casing to inside casing plus 1") but you would probably be wise to remove the trim on a window to make sure that there will be enough room in the rough opening. You never can be too sure.

Generally when you completely replace a window, the trim has to come off to get the old window out. Then you would have to perfectly center the new window in EXACTLY the same spot in order to reuse the trim and have it cover the old paint lines exactly.

In most cases, I find that it's best to just get some new trim for the new window. In many cases, the window can be ordered just a 1/4 bigger so that you will be sure that once the trim is installed, the trim will cover the old paint lines so that there is no drywall work. If you are getting a wood window, you will be staining or painting it anyway, so it often makes sense to get new trim too. It's the least expensive part of the whole thing, usually.

You also want the trim off when you install the window so that you can insulate the perimeter of the new window.

Be sure you check the wall thickness before you order your windows. Ordering windows for the correct wall thickness will also save you some work.
 
  #7  
Old 11-28-13, 05:28 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Evansville, WI
Posts: 329
Thanks. We have windows ordered and are skipping the siding for now, because the windows are $o expen$ive, no way we can afford to do the siding, and I guess doesn't really matter. We are getting Marvin Infinities, so yeah $$$ bucks. They have a line of windows, "full frame" I think they refer to them as, which do go out to the wall studs, but no nail flash or whatever it's called.
Price is jaw-dropping but my wife and I both think these are the best.
 
  #8  
Old 11-28-13, 05:31 AM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 43,796
Depending on the color you want, painting the vinyl siding could be a viable option. The siding will no longer be maintenance free but with proper prep and the right paint - a vinyl siding paint job should last 10 yrs or more.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes