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Exterior Door threshold problem. How to fix? pics

Exterior Door threshold problem. How to fix? pics

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Old 10-13-13, 04:15 PM
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Exterior Door threshold problem. How to fix? pics

Hi there,

Looking for some help here on how to solve a problem with an exterior door that is floating off the garage floor. Previous owner had some a concrete block propping up the door threshold

This is the door from the garage to the yard. The concrete level is about 3.5 inches higher in the yard than the garage floor.

Can I just pour concrete on the existing garage floor to create a sort of platform?

Will there be trouble with bonding to the existing garage floor. I would like to find a permanent and rigorous solution. Thanks for reading.

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Old 10-13-13, 05:05 PM
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Is that a wooden hollow core door? If so that's not even legal. It needs to be a steel door.
Not there to see it, but it looks like the swing is wrong, it's going to take up room in that narrow garage and may hit the car.
There's also no threshold under the door there now so you may want to consider just installing a whole new door at the same time.

If I was to do that job I would use some Tap-Con screws in the slab to give some extra holding power then a bonding agent.
That's going to now be a trip hazard so you may want to sloop the part going into the house at a 45 deg. angle or at least paint it safety yellow one the outside edge.
 
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Old 10-13-13, 05:23 PM
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Huh. that's pretty awesome! IMO, you should probably drill some short rebar down into the pad, make a form, and pour that space full of concrete. Brush some bonding agent onto the concrete before you place the new concrete inside the form... You will also want to set a threshold into the wet cement to give the existing door bottom something to close against. It will be smart to try and form the concrete so that it is crowned in the middle- so that it slopes to the outside on the exterior side of the threshold, and slopes to the inside on the inside of the threshold... when you place the threshold into the wet cement, it should also be sloped toward the outside. You'll close the door on it to ensure a tight seal, and let the cement set up.

Best sort of threshold would have a lip and a bulb seal on the interior, for the door to close against... kind of like this one... Choose brass, not aluminum. Aluminum and concrete don't play well together.
 
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Old 10-14-13, 06:40 AM
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Thanks for the replies XSleeper and joecaption1

joecaption1: You cannot tell from the picture but it is a steel door and the door opens outward. Thats a good point about a tripping hazard. Is it hard to pour a sloped concrete ramp that will not crumble at the thin edge?

Xsleeper: Thanks for the comprehensive reply, also hilarious that you find it awesome!! thats a good idea to set the threshold into the wet cement. I'm going to try it next weekend!
 
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Old 10-15-13, 04:44 PM
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Getting ready to do this here, XSleeper, just wanted a few clarifications. Would appreciate your help. The slab is small only (.75 X 3 X .25) ft.

1. Can I skip the rebar and just use a bonding adhesive?
2. Will the form only have one side... since the walls and the patio will act as the other sides. Or should I build a 3 sided form, but then I will have a gap on the two edges of the door

thanks
 
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Old 10-15-13, 08:06 PM
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On your measurements, if I have your figures right, you mean it's 9" wide, 3 ft long, and 3" thick?

You can certainly skip the rebar if you want. the main thing rebar will do is prevent the slab from moving anywhere if it would happen to crack. A few short stubs of rebar (or even an anchor sticking up a little ways) would keep the piece locked in. But I doubt it will go anywhere, at least not in my lifetime... or what's left of it anyway. LOL

Yes, the form will only have one side, and that is across the inside of the wall. You will pour up against the existing on the other 3 sides.
 
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Old 10-15-13, 08:32 PM
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Yes, those are the measurements. Its just a thin strip under the threshold.

Installing rebar needs tools I do not have. So I was hoping that since its a small slab and surrounded on three sides that I could get away without it...

Thanks for your input and Hopefully, you are not more than 80 years old!!
 
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