Caulking storm door.

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  #1  
Old 11-28-13, 08:00 PM
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Caulking storm door.

I was doing some work in the basement when I noticed that the sill plate sitting on the foundation was wet. Yesterday we had torrential down pours and I mean torrential with 50 mile per hour winds. I noticed the wetness on the sill plate in the basement today was directly below my upstairs exterior door. The exterior door has a storm door on it. The storm door still had the full screen on it which I replaced with the glass today. I came upstairs to examine the door and noticed water did get in behind the storm door because the door jam was still wet from yesterday. ( I assume from the screen and I am assuming this is how the water dripped down below).

I noticed that the storm door was never really caulked when installed because if I look out each side of the door where the door molding was built out I can see daylight hairline cracks. Can I just caulk from the outside along the seams of the molding? or do I have to remove the door and caulk around the frame then reset the molding?
 
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  #2  
Old 11-28-13, 08:52 PM
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Storm doors aren't meant to be air tight. Caulk it if you want but I don't recommend it. Nowhere in your installation instructions will you find the directions to caulk on a storm door.

What kind of siding do you have?
 
  #3  
Old 11-28-13, 09:18 PM
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Vinyl siding. In that case I'm just going to caulk around it and not take it off.
 
  #4  
Old 11-29-13, 05:18 AM
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I figured you would say it was vinyl. The water below the door in the basement on your sill plate is probably all coming from water getting behind the siding that is around the door... primarily the bottom left and right sides of the door sill and maybe underneath if there is any siding below the door. I would be 100% sure that the water in the basement has nothing to do with the storm door, and has everything to do with water blowing into the j-channels.

The fact that water penetrated into the basement makes me wonder if your house has any housewrap (a WRB) behind the siding. The WRB usually prevents leaks like that from showing up inside the house. You could open up the siding just slightly at a seam and peek in there.
 
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Old 11-29-13, 05:26 AM
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Can you post a picture?
Is there a stoop, deck, patio ECT. close to or even with the threshold?
100% sure when the main door was installed it was flashed under it and the flashing brought down over the outside of the house wrap?
Is there something under the threshold that supports it on the outside sitting out beyond the threshold? That will act like a funnel and direct the water under it.
I agree it's the main door leaking not the storm causing the problem.
Vinyl siding installed correctly does not need caulking.
 
  #6  
Old 11-29-13, 06:19 AM
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Here are some. The small gap between the stoop case and the house is not caulked. Not sure if that can cause it?
 
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Old 11-29-13, 06:22 AM
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A few more angles of the door
 
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Old 11-29-13, 06:29 AM
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Also on top of the 35 is a flat white piece. I'm should put a bead there.
 
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Old 11-29-13, 08:10 AM
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Yes the whole house is wrapped under the vinyl.
 
  #10  
Old 01-12-14, 10:25 AM
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Figured I'd update this thread. Was having some water leak into the basement down the sheathing and onto the plate on the foundation. It's coming from upstairs around the corner of the door. I took some pics at the top of the door behind the j channel and found this.
[URL="[URL=http://s286.photobucket.com/user/moreira85/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zpsa614a7c4.jpg.html][/URL"][/URL



[URL="[URL=http://s286.photobucket.com/user/moreira85/media/Mobile%20Uploads/image_zps1c743b57.jpg.html][/URL"][/URL
 
  #11  
Old 01-12-14, 11:41 AM
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I can kind of see a notch, but can't get a good feel for where that is located in relation to anything. I'm guessing it must be at the ends of the head flashing where the ends of the crown moulding head piece extend 1 or 2" out over the face of the siding. If so, that in itself is not a problem if everything under it was done and lapped correctly.

Water gets behind vinyl siding in many places and it is not a problem because the WRB is the primary barrier that protects/prevents leaks. If you have a leak it means the WRB is compromised somewhere, not lapped correctly, or not extended far enough below the sill plate.

9 times out of 10 water leaks come from the bottom corners of the door where the vertical j-channels end. I was just leaving on vacation when you posted your pictures on 11/29 and missed a few days worth of posts. But in looking back at those pictures, I don't see anything that's suspicious, and I also don't see any pictures of the siding on the left and right sides of the door. You seem to be looking on top... I would be looking on the bottom left and right corners. (Maybe post some pictures to the left and right of the stoop. Identify on the pictures where the leak is being seen inside, in relation to the door. Pictures should be back far enough that we can get a broad sense of what you have. Closeups don't always help.)

You can easily remove vinyl siding so I would unzip the siding at the bottom. Sometimes when you do that, the problem area becomes obvious (like a horizontal j-channel that is dumping loads of water out the end). If it doesn't seem obvious, slit the WRB and see if it is wet behind the WRB. if it is, you know the problem is higher up.

We can't be there to do the detective work, but you can, so that's the best advice I could give on where to start. Get yourself a Malco Sideswiper unlock tool and get to work. Start at the bottom, see what you find and work your way up. If it's dry behind the WRB and you can tell the sheathing has not been wet, you know that area isn't the problem.

Doing this as soon as possible after a leak is best, because once it dries out it becomes a lot harder to find the evidence.
 
  #12  
Old 01-12-14, 12:02 PM
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The pic is the top left corner j channel
 
  #13  
Old 01-12-14, 12:06 PM
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Yeah, that's what I thought.
 
  #14  
Old 01-12-14, 01:15 PM
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Here are some pics of the bottom left. Disregard the first pic It appears that from looking in the basement and lining up the leak it's between the two white moldings where that vertical j channel is.
http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/l...pse0af553e.jpg[/URL]
http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/l...psfff4626b.jpg
http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/l...psad1773dd.jpg
http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/l...ps0790fd8e.jpg
 
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Old 01-12-14, 01:46 PM
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I would remove the first couple pieces of siding in this picture and see what you find. I'd also caulk the textured cement stoop to the apron trim below the door sill and plinth trim, using a polyurethane sealant that matches the color of the cement.
 
  #16  
Old 01-12-14, 02:20 PM
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I'll pick up a siding remover at the depot tomorrow. I plan on caulking the stoop. I already have the gray concrete caulk didn't know if I had to wait for it to get warmer.
 
  #17  
Old 01-12-14, 02:41 PM
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If it's a latex, yes. If it's solvent based, no.
 
  #18  
Old 01-13-14, 02:22 AM
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If you are using a solvent based caulk in cold weather it will flow easier if you store the caulking in a warm place prior to using it ... like many things it gets stiff when cold.
 
  #19  
Old 01-18-14, 03:51 PM
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I'll keep you in the loop on this. My cousin is a carpenter and out of work so figured I would help him out and let him tackle this. Very weird we had a ton of rain today all day and no water at all got down in the sill plate. Only happens sometimes like torrential downpours even though it rained real hard today.
 
  #20  
Old 07-13-14, 08:46 PM
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Finally gonna get around to this soon. The last piece of vinly siding at the bottom in this pic looks like it has dis coloration from water damage if you zoom in. That is directly where the water is below in the basement.
http://i286.photobucket.com/albums/l...ps0790fd8e.jpg

How should I approach diagnosing the problem?
 
  #21  
Old 07-14-14, 02:56 PM
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I would remove the first couple pieces of siding in this picture and see what you find.
If there is no WRB behind the siding, that would be a good place to start. The drip cap over the door should be BEHIND the WRB so that any water that is already behind the siding and running down the WRB from above does not go behind the drip cap. You might also want to put a wall flashing (shaped like an L) on the bottom where the wall and cement meet. The bottom leg should be sealed to the cement. Again, the WRB should lap over the flashing.

The WRB is a critical part of making sure vinyl siding doesn't cause problems with leaks, because the siding itself is not waterproof. Years ago many people didn't think about that and skipped it. It wasn't put in the codes until about 2003 and even then a lot of people are slow to catch on.
 
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