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Storm Door Fogging/Icing in Cold Weather


Aseret_in_MO's Avatar
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12-24-13, 05:45 AM   #1  
Storm Door Fogging/Icing in Cold Weather

My full view storm door ices/fogs up in cold weather. The door behind the storm is oak and there are two places (bottom corner and by the lock set) where I can see a gap. There is copper flashing around all sides of the door. This front door is old with an arched top and stained glass insert. Replacing the front door is not an option for me.

Can I add extra weather stripping over the copper flashing? Any ideas on how I can keep my storm from fogging up in the cold?

 
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Pulpo's Avatar
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12-24-13, 07:10 AM   #2  
You can certainly try some weather stripping but I would use something sticks to the surface. I wouldn't put any tacks in the door. Test it first.

 
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12-24-13, 07:42 AM   #3  
I'd suggest you carefully examine the copper flashing and determine if it can be salvaged or if it needs to be replaced. It could be that the "spring" of the copper has just worn out and it needs to be retensioned. By carefully bending the copper fin so that it springs open more, you can put more tension back on the door as it closes so that it seals tight. I'd advise you not bend it too much the first time out... you can always open and close the door a few times, testing to see if it seems tighter or if it needs more tension. A good way to test it is to insert a notecard along side the door, shut it... then see how hard it is to pull the notecard out. Bend the fin a little, close the door, and try the notecard again.

Once you have retensioned the copper fin weatherstrip, you may find that it has improved the seal sufficiently. If not, I would probably suggest you add on one of the aftermarket bulb weatherstrips that is held in an aluminum extrusion. You apply it from the outside of the door with the door closed. The bulb pushes up against the door just as a door stop would.

If you don't like or want the look of the aluminum/bulb weatherstrip, a more traditional way to weatherstrip those old doors is to simply add a thin felt strip to the face of the door stop. While the copper nails to the side of the jamb, the felt was often added to the face of the stop so that the door would have a "cushion" to close against. Like the copper, the felt was also nailed to the wood door stop with small nails.

 
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12-24-13, 08:37 AM   #4  
Thanks. I will look into both kinds of weather stripping. Hopefully something will work. This only happens when the temps get real cold like 15 degrees or lower.

 
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12-24-13, 08:41 AM   #5  
Unlikely you'll eliminate it completely. Warmer moist air against the poorly sealed storm door will always result in frost/ice. Best you can probably hope for is to confine it to just part of the outer door.


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12-24-13, 08:45 AM   #6  
Here's a pic of the felt I was mentioning. The old style used to have a crimped aluminum edge that kind of helped stiffen one of the edges and hold the nails. Not sure if that is available anymore.

 
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