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Help with Andersen Narroline 200 Windows


dim0503's Avatar
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04-22-14, 01:32 PM   #1  
Help with Andersen Narroline 200 Windows

We bought a house last year and this past winter was brutal. The house has Andersen doublehung Narroline 200 windows and some of them are very leaky.
When you close the window, it goes all the way down but does not seem to create a good seal. The window seems to spring back up about 1/16 of an inch and creates a gap for heat loss.. Not having much experience with windows, I am not sure what would be causing the window to raise about 1/16 of an inch.

Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks
-Dimitry

 
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04-22-14, 01:57 PM   #2  
Some of the pros here are very good with windows so I will withhold my comments. But the windows are only a small part of the "brutal" cold you experienced. There is a sequence of reviewing your house from top to bottom to identify energy loss and make some corrections. Many of the improvements are DIY and low cost.

When you are ready just ask.

Bud

 
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04-22-14, 06:53 PM   #3  
Bud,

Thanks for the info. I did have someone come out and do an energy audit which was very helpful. I did most of the things they recommended but I could see light coming through the spacing of the window and window sill. Any time you can see light then that means energy loss. If you have any other suggestions, I am always willing to learn something new.

Thanks
-Dimitry

 
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04-22-14, 08:31 PM   #4  
Since these are double hung windows that raise vertically I'm guessing you are seeing this at the bottom of the window... the only thing I can imagine is that they are maybe out of square. If the light can only be seen on one corner of the bottom, then they are probably installed out of square, which means they are not completely level and plumb.

Just the fact that there is "light" doesn't mean a lot, though... because some weatherstrips are translucent and let light pass, but not air. If, by "light" you mean a clear air space that you can stick a credit card through, well then yeah... that's not right. Your best bet would be to either call the installers back or to call Andersen directly and lodge a complaint. Are you actually feeling a breeze or are you just assuming there is energy loss because you can see "light"?

The 200 series Narrowline has a compression weatherstrip across the bottom of the sill, and 1/16" sounds like the right amount of tolerance. Weatherstripping like that does tend to get smashed but it usually will spring up and fill the void, especially if it's 1/16", so contrary to what you might think, they are still doing their job. Unless there is something wrong with your weatherstripping, like it's hard and brittle or broken.

 
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04-23-14, 05:07 AM   #5  
During the winter, I could feel a breeze coming through the gap. I was not sure if the problem was too much tension on the balancers in the windows or like you said the window was not plumb or level.

The windows are approximately 27 years old. I was wondering:
1)What is usually the warranty on Andersen Windows?

2)Does it make financial sense to bring in a contractor to try to fix the level and plumb?

Thanks
-Dimitry

 
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04-23-14, 05:47 AM   #6  
I assume you are seeing this gap, even when the windows are locked??? If you didn't have the window locked, that may be the solution.

Otherwise, you need to figure out if the window is out of square -or- if the weatherstrip needs to be replaced.

If it is out of square, the gap will appear on one side or the other under the sash, but not straight across.

If it is straight across, the weatherstrip has likely gotten hard or has shrunk slightly or just is not as flexible as it used to be. In that case, you could call or email Andersen's service department, tell them the code that is etched in the corner of the glass (which establishes the date of mfg) and see if they can send out some new weatherstripping.

 
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04-23-14, 05:49 AM   #7  
Hi Dimitry,
Again I'll let "X" take the 27 year old question, but as for the audit you received there is a wide range of work that is being called an "Energy Audit" and some are not going to get to the meat of a homes energy problems.

1. Did they perform a blower door test to measure the air leakage of your home and if so, what were the results, CFM50 = ?.
2. Did they use an infrared camera and provide pictures of where the air is leaking in?
3. What did they provide for a report when done?

Bud

 
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04-25-14, 08:45 PM   #8  
XSleeper,

After researching, I think I found the solution. I am going to install Andersen® Sash Lock Spacer in Stone Color (1968 to Present) and that will make it a tighter seal.

Thanks
-Dimitry

 
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04-25-14, 08:53 PM   #9  
Bud9051,

1. Did they perform a blower door test to measure the air leakage of your home and if so, what were the results, CFM50 = ?.
Optimal Level = 4302
Proposed Level = 3556
Your Home = 4445

I am not sure why he would recommend 3556 when optimal is 4302.

2. Did they use an infrared camera and provide pictures of where the air is leaking in?
Yes he did provide those and I fixed most of them except putting in more insulation which they tried to sell me.

3. What did they provide for a report when done?

Existing Home Description
House Type = Single-Family Detached
Conditioned Floor Area = 5363.8 Sq.Ft.
Number of Bedrooms = 5
Number of Occupants = 4
Year Home was Built = 1981-1990
Stories Above Grade = 1.50
Primary Foundation Type = Conditioned Basement

Existing Systems
Heating Systems
6.8 HSPF Electricity Air Source
Heat Pump; 8.6 HSPF Electricity
Air Source Heat Pump; 8.6 HSPF
Electricity Air Source Heat Pump

Cooling Systems
11 SEER Central AC; 14.5 SEER
Central AC; 11 SEER Central AC

Water Heating Systems
80 gallon Electricity Storage (Tank)

Your home's air leakage rate is 1.03 times the optimal rate.
Your house is relatively tight. However, further tightening through air sealing
measures is often still possible.

Thanks
-Dimitry

 
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10-24-15, 12:17 PM   #10  
You can rehabilitate those windows.

I have the same Narroline windows. They probably just need some simple rehabilitation. Mine had the same problems after 40-odd years, and some repair parts fixed them right up.

To tighten them up, you will need the following parts. You MUST get Andersen replacement parts; the stuff the big box stores sell won't fit right.

* Sash Lock & Keeper
* Bulb Check Rail Weatherstrip
* Top and Bottom Rail Foam Weatherstrip

The older metal sash lock on the Narroline windows doesn't clamp very tight to begin with, and as it ages it loosens up. The current composite locks are much, much tighter. And if someone tried using a generic sash lock to replace a broken one, well, it's never going to seal tightly. The Narroline window design just isn't compatible with a generic sash lock.

The check-rail weatherstrip on the older windows is a simple plastic flap. After a few decades, it loses its springiness and doesn't seal. Plus, if someone painted it, well, it won't work well at all. The newer bulb weatherstrip is much tighter. It's easy to replace: just peel the old one out with a putty knife or 5-in-1 tool, and push the replacement into the groove.

The foam weatherstrip on the top and bottom sashes sits in a groove. The old foam breaks down and stops sealing, and people tend to paint over it, making it seal poorly. It peels out—sometimes it comes out easy, sometimes it was glued in overzealously or painted in place—and you slip in the new foam after applying a few dots of caulk to hold it in place.

Once you get the hang of it, it takes about ten minutes a window to refresh them. While you're at it, you can check to see if any of the window balances have jammed; those are pretty easy to replace, too.

If the glass is intact and the jambs aren't warped, and it's just leaks at the joints that are bothering you, there's no reason to replace them. A little TLC and the right parts, and you can bring back their performance for a lot less money.

 
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