Door Louver Installation

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  #1  
Old 08-03-14, 09:15 AM
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Door Louver Installation

I am considering installing a louver on the utiility closet door that opens to the exterior. It is a small 4x4 closet that houses the water heater and furnace, both gas appliances. My intention is to allow the appliance to breath, and by cutting a hole in the door, I'll be able to access the closet because the key is lost. Any issues with doing this on an exterior door?
 
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Old 08-03-14, 03:10 PM
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Hi Gas applainces need air for proper combution. you probably have some type of vent in the inside of the room. That being said more venting aint going to hurt. Go to a hardware store or big box to the roofing section they have all types of vents. You probably want to use a flat one with louvers. Get two one for the top and one for the bottom get the louvers first so you know what size to cut the holes. You also may need a new lock. Get one that is the same brand as the key that opens the house and have the new lock rekeyed to fit the house key.
Good Luk Woodbutcher
 
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Old 08-03-14, 03:50 PM
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Having experienced a burst pipe this winter, I question too much airflow given that there may be a possibility of one of the lines on the water heater freezing. I too think that there is probably sufficient air flow already working into the utility room. Can you access the hinges? or maybe cut the lockset from the door to gain access?
 
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Old 08-03-14, 04:55 PM
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There is no ventilation in the closet. I currently have the crawlspace access door cracked about 6" to provide some air. That's a good point about cold air getting in there in the winter. I didn't think of that. I have access to the hinges, but it's an exterior door with weatherstripping and there isn't a lot of wiggle room. Could I drill out the lock or is the metal pretty solid? The lock is similar to this one: http://www.lowes.com/pd_602941-38004...|$15%20-%20$25
 
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Old 08-04-14, 05:50 AM
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Sorry Moss, I'm not very adept at breaking into locked structures, so I can't help with the drilling out of the lockset. I only change them out. You might be able to get a better look if you removed the brickmold trim from around the door to see if you can somehow depress the lockset. Drill a hole from the back of the strike area and insert something to depress the lockset.
 
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Old 08-04-14, 06:16 AM
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I would not put a louvered door on this unit. Has this been in operation for a long time? Has combustion air been a problem or has freezing ocured in the past? If the original design has been working, leave well enough alone.
 
  #7  
Old 08-04-14, 09:07 AM
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The pilot light on the water heater went out last winter when it was in the teens. I believe the only way it has been getting air is through cracks and holes in the drywall where water pipes have been run. The original door did not have weather-stripping, so that also fed it air. Now that things are sealed up more tightly, I figured it would need some other way to get sufficient air. Regarding the lock, I think I may just cut a hole in the drywall from the master bedroom, which is adjacent to the closet, and somehow reach the door knob and unlock it from the inside (room needs drywall work and paint anyhow). I need one of those mechanical toy arms that kids play with.
 
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Old 08-04-14, 03:49 PM
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Hi, To get the door open use a screwdriver and hammer put the screwdriver in the edge of the piece on the door knob that is about the size of a silver dollar and drive it in a little then pop the piece out. Use a needle nose plier and turn the small shaft inside the knob a quarter turn that will unlock the door. You may need a new lock.
Woodbutcher
 
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