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Window Install/Reinstall Question (with Pics)


Bones45's Avatar
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08-18-14, 04:09 PM   #1  
Window Install/Reinstall Question (with Pics)

Hey All,

Just looking for the best way to secure this basement window.

Had some rain in the finished basement, so I ripped out the drywall, insulation, etc

This window was loose -- not the pane mind you --- the entire window.. I can pretty much pull it into the basement.

The screw holes in the window frame weren't even used. I have about 2" space from the 2x4's to the wall and the window just sits there, not really screwed into anything.

The holes to secure the window miss the framing for the walls. I guess I need to nail some sort of backer piece to the back of the wall studs to secure the window, make sure its secure, and then seal the crap out of it.

What is the best and easiest way to do this? There is a water line running through the bottom of the studs, so taking them out isn't an option.

Thanks all!Name:  window1.jpg
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XSleeper's Avatar
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08-18-14, 05:09 PM   #2  
I would want to see a closeup picture of the windows exterior before I answer.

 
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08-18-14, 05:18 PM   #3  
Another piece of wood should have been nailed or screwed into at least one of the 2x4s to take up the extra space & hold the mounting screws. That's all that needs to be done. Of course, caulking needs to be added afterwards.

 
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08-18-14, 05:50 PM   #4  
xsleeper -- pic from outside below.

Pulpo -- agreed.. just not sure the best way to get that done --- not a whole lot of room to work with, ya know?

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08-18-14, 07:44 PM   #5  
You have to start over. The window has to be removed, the nailer(s) added, then reinstalled.

 
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08-18-14, 07:55 PM   #6  
Install glasblock. Sealed with sicone and or cement. And they can be had in clear glass.

 
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08-18-14, 08:57 PM   #7  
Having been mainly a vinyl window installer for nearly the first 20 years of my career... I will say that windows that small don't always HAVE to have installation screws. BUT- that is when the window is shimmed into the rough opening so that it can't move up or down, left or right- and when it is confined between an exterior stop and an interior stop, so that the window can't go anywhere.

Your window isn't shimmed in place... it has no interior stop to prevent it from "falling in", and it apparently isn't even caulked to the exterior cladding. I also don't see any weep holes on the exterior side of the frame, although the picture isn't that close/clear. The way that exterior sill is wrapped doesn't inspire much confidence... it looks like it's not sloped at all.

At any rate, I don't know that you need to start over, but #1, the window should be sealed to the exterior cladding (not all sealants stick well to vinyl- I'd recommend OSI Quad).

#2, you should shim the bottom, left and right sides of the window so that it doesn't shift around in the RO. Many window companies recommend insulating and caulking the inside perimeter as well. (i'm not a fan of caulking the inside, but whatever.)

#3, you should install an interior jamb, or at the least an interior stop, so that the interior perimeter of that window is trimmed and can no longer "fall in" when you operate the window.

If a guy was going to "start over", the rough opening should be made larger so that the window could actually have it's own jamb that has a greater wall thickness than the existing framing has, and a sloped sill on bottom to direct rain water to the outside.

 
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08-19-14, 06:23 AM   #8  
How would glass block be better than a functional window?

 
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08-19-14, 08:28 AM   #9  
Xsleeper -- Apologies, but there were jambs on all four sides of the window, extremely tight and nailed into the 2x4 framing. I removed them to clean up all the dirt which had come in and to find out the problem. All can and will be re-installed. The window was loose even with the jambs installed.

Thanks for your info -- very helpful. I'll re-install the jams and use some shims to tighten as much as possible. Use that sealant you recommended outside the window around the frame, and then use Good Stuff around in spots inside the window.

The key here is that the gutter downspout dumped water to that side of the house. We had 10" of rain here last week and that was the main issue. I'm having the downspout moved to the other side of the house where it will run water right down the driveway using gravity and out to the street. Not sure why they didn't do that in the first place. I don't think any water came in through the window, although I'm sure it didn't help. As you can see by the pic, its about 4-5" off the ground.

Between the gutter change, window securing and then some sealant on the wall itself, I should be in much better shape.

 
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08-19-14, 05:04 PM   #10  
How would glass block be better than a functional window?
Well, typically a basement window is not opened or left open. Especially if one uses a dehumidifier. Second the OP mentioned flooding through the window. Glassblock would eliminate that problem. Third a basement window is a typical entry for break-ins. Again glassblock would minimize that. Glassblock has very good insulation properties. Glassbolck can be had in decorator styles and with a vent opening if need be. Window dressing is not necessary with glassblock.

What I'm getting at is, unless the OP had a very specific reason to have a full function basement window then glassblock is a very good choice to keep out high water problem and is maintenance free.

After installing mine several years ago I can't picture not having galssblock. I have complete peace of mind that while I'm sleeping or away from home no one is going to sneak in through the basement. They'll need to do it in the high risk upper floor, very visible area.

 
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08-19-14, 06:50 PM   #11  
If glass block is a possible point of entry for thieves, it's also a possible point of egress, in an emergency. I would feel trapped with glass block. Reinstalling that window is much easier than installing glass block.

 
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08-19-14, 07:46 PM   #12  
True, anything can happen, but the question to be considered is the basement area a bedroom and regular living space and will egress in case of fire or other emergency be hampered by the usual route? Basement windows are not very easy to get out of. It normally requires a slim person and an elevated step or stool. In the overall scheme of things I'd rather have it secured to prevent intruders as opposed to getting out. But again the big question is how will it be used? As a finished rec room, egress is not a high priority in my eyes. However, as a bedroom then its a whole new ball game.

 
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08-19-14, 09:06 PM   #13  
The requirements for egress are the same as the requirements for entry. It's a problem if you are fat in either direction, in or out. There is no difference between the two.

 
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08-20-14, 08:59 AM   #14  
It's now an office/ kids playroom, so there isn't a bedroom issue, but I would enjoy some air down there if possible. The glass block is a nice option under certain circumstances.

 
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