Replacement Door Problem

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  #1  
Old 10-24-14, 06:16 PM
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Replacement Door Problem

I have another thread where I was asking about making cheap hollow-core doors for my basement. I decided to take my luan doors from my main floor (since they are old and looking crappy) and use them in the basement, and get new nicer ones for my main floor.

I would get the hollow-core that look like panel doors for the main floor. (Masonite Textured 6-Panel Hollow Core Primed Composite Interior Door Slab-16474 at The Home Depot)

But, in measuring my current doors, they are about 1/8 of an inch less in width and an inch less in height than the Home Depot ones. I'm not sure why, but my luan doors (original with the house) measure 29 1/8 inch wide and 79 inches tall. One of them is even 29 3/4 inches wide.

I dont want to put new frames in. I wanted to just replace the door as simply as possible.

It doesnt look like I can cut these doors without making a mess of them.

Any ideas what to do here?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-25-14, 05:28 PM
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On your new door decide what is the top of the door. Example on a six panel door the small panels go to the top. On a slab door the top may be marked if it isn’t then it will make no difference.
I have hung about 200 doors as a repair not construction. I will try to help you as best as I can.
With your old door in place check the fit. Most fits are OK. Fit is the reveal on the top bottom and sides of the door. With the old door still in place mark it top and back. The back is the side with the hinge pins. Mark the new door top and back this is for your reference it is very easy to get turned around doing this. Pull the pins on the old door and remove all the hardware including the hinge leafs. Do not remove hinge leafs on the door jamb. Measure the old door and cut the new one to that length be careful not to splinter the new door, score the door or clamp a piece of scrap wood on the side where the saw blade leaves the wood.
Set the old door on the side with the hinge mortise up. Line up the new door at the top of the old one. The back of one should be against the front of the other. With a combo square scribe the mortise of the old door to the new door. Now take one of the hinge leafs and trace the hinge between the mortise lines you just drew remember the pins on the hinge go to the back of the door. The hinge leaf is probably marked on the back side from paint or varnish, use this line to guide you when tracing the hinge. An interior door is 1 3/8”The hinge will set about 1 1/4” across the door. Use a router to cut out the mortise if you use a chisel be careful cut only across the grain of the door style or you will split it.
Install the leafs on the new door with only one screw on each leaf make sure to drill a pilot hole for the screw or you WILL SPLIT the door. If the door has 3 hinges , leave the middle one off until you fit the door.
Place the new door in the jamb put the top pin in first then the bottom pin, you may have to adjust the bottom leaf a little tap it up or down to make it fit. That’s why I use only one screw at first. With both pins installed, drill your pilot holes and put in the rest of screws in the top and bottom hinges.
Put a screw on the front of the door where the knob will go, you need the screw to pull the door closed so you can mark the door where it hits the jamb. Remove the strike plate off the door jamb. With a pencil mark the door where it hits the jamb. Remove the door and plane down to the line, take your time. You may have to mark the door 2 or 3 times to get the fit.
With a pencil, mark on the back side door casing, the center of the hole located on the door jamb used for the door lock Close the door and transfer the mark to the door. With a combo square use that mark to scribe a line on both sides of door about 3” long and across the style.
Now find the back set of the lock you are using. A new lock will tell you, if you use the old lock, measure the old door from the edge to the center of the hole. 2 3/8” and 2 3/4 are common sizes. Measure also the size of the hole you will need 2 1/8’’is common.
If the back set is 2 3/8. On the line you drew on the door make a mark 2 3/8 on each side of the door. If the hole is 2 1/8, use a 2 1/8 hole saw, cut half way through the door and finish the cut from the other side do not plunge straight through you will splinter the door. Mark the center of style and drill a hole to fit the door latch use a small as possible hole to fit the latch you don’t have much room to spare. Some latches need to be mortised to fit if this is the case put the latch in the hole and trace the face of it then remove the needed amount of wood and install it. Remember to drill pilot holes. Install the lockset and the third hinge if needed. Now wasn’t that easy?

Good Luck, Woodbutcher
 
  #3  
Old 10-27-14, 04:41 AM
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Woodbutcher, thanks for the great detail.

I have a question though. Why wouldnt I measure the old door (top to bottom, left to right) and cut the new door to the exact same size. And then begin the process.

I just dont get why the left/right dimensions are not taken care of until after the door is hung initialy.
 
  #4  
Old 10-27-14, 01:50 PM
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After thinking it through more, I'm guessing the reason is because, on the new door, even though the location of the hinge mortises is transferred from the old door, the mortise depth might be slightly different, giving a different fit/reveal. Is that the reason or is there more?
 
  #5  
Old 10-27-14, 05:06 PM
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Hello, The hinges should be flush with the door. The mortise should be aout 1/8 deep.
One reason to hang the door and mark then plane is most doors are planed on an angle on the latch side. Measure the door on both sides, the smallest side will come into contact with the door jamb first. Also nothing is perfect . It's like a suit they measure the waist and inseam and make it fit you.
Woodbutcher
 
  #6  
Old 10-27-14, 06:18 PM
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When you say that most doors are planed on an angle on the latch side, do you mean that most doors "should" be planed on the latch side?

I ask because none of the doors at Home Depot are angled that way and none of the doors in my house are either. So I am assuming that it is something that should be done by a contracter that knows what he is doing--but often is not.

So, when I plane I should put a slight angle on the side. Im guessing about 1/8 inch different in width between the front and back of the door, the front being longer.

Also, my hinges are recessed. About a fraction less than 1/8 of an inch. So I will make them flush, although that means that my original measurement of 29 7/8 is really more like 29 3/4.
 
  #7  
Old 10-29-14, 04:47 PM
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Hi, You can plane the latch side straight you will just have a slightly bigger gap on the latch side when the door is closed.
If you have an old door that you're not going to use down stairs do that one first and practice your skills on the old door.
Woodbutcher
 
  #8  
Old 10-30-14, 06:32 PM
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ok, I started my first of 11 doors. All was good until I planed. I used an electric planer (got it for free) and it worked great except that, at the ends, I guess I didnt leave the planing surface on the same plane. So, it tapered off at the end and cut a but too deep there.

Not sure if I explained it well. But imagine planing the length of the door and going a little too deep at the end.

I can see how this happened--as the plane works its way along the side of the door, the bottom of the plane rests on the surface in both in front of and behind the blades. But when the plane leaves the surface, there is nothing keeping the front level, so it falls a bit.

I guess the question is, is this simply lack of experience or is there a technique for avoiding this?
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-14, 04:00 PM
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Plane into the wood not out. As you approach the other end turn around and go the other way.
Woodbutcher
 
  #10  
Old 11-03-14, 07:16 AM
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"Plane into the wood"

Is this standard practice or just a way for a novice to avoid making a mistake?

In any case, it worked-- your entire process was perfect. 7 our of 9 doors hung this weekend (didnt do the knobs yet).


Thanks so much.
 
  #11  
Old 11-03-14, 07:23 AM
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Standard way of doing it. You start at the end and stop before the other end, then come back from the other end, esp with a power planer. Not a newbie thing...just the way it's done.
 
  #12  
Old 11-04-14, 10:37 AM
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ok, now, to paint them. Roller or brush?

They are raised panel doors, will a roller do a nice job on them?
 
  #13  
Old 11-04-14, 01:53 PM
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Oh, in addition to the painting, one more question. One of the doors is a bathroom door. The hallway it is in has 4 other doors (all white 6 panel hollow core).

So, since it is right next to these doors, naturally I would have a white 6 panel hollow core door for the bathroom too.

But, INSIDE the bathroom, the trim is oak (window, door, medicine cabinet) So, it would be nice to have the inside oak and the outside white.

Without buying an expensive oak door, the best I can think is to just buy a luan 6 panel hollow core and stain it as close as possible to an oak-y color on the bathroom side and paint it white outside.

Or a solid pine door (slightly more expensive)

Or, this might be a stretch, buy the white 6 panel hollow core. Paint the outside white and on the inside, fill the recesses of the panels with an epoxy (or something) so it is flat and then cover the inside with a thin oak veneer. It would be flat inside, but oak.

What would you do?
 
  #14  
Old 11-04-14, 02:01 PM
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raised panel doors, will a roller do a nice job on them?
IMO a brush does a better job but a nice job can be done with a roller. You can apply the paint with a roller and tip it off with a brush [brush lightly over the wet paint to knock out the roller stipple] or use one of those mini rollers which can pretty much roll the entire thing. Many with poor brushing skills do a better job with a roller.

As far as I know, you can't get a luan hollow core panel door. The hollow core panel doors are all masonite [or similar] the wood panel doors are usually pine unless you go expensive. I used to paint for one builder that used painted masonite doors on all his stained houses so having a painted door wouldn't be overly odd. You could also faux paint a masonite door to resemble oak or any other stain/wood. I'm not overly fond of painting solid wood panel doors as the panels will move slightly with temp/humidity changes leaving an unsightly gap where the panel meets the frame of the door.
 
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