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How to save this door? Is it worth it?


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11-11-14, 08:43 PM   #1  
How to save this door? Is it worth it?

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So I have a French door by my front door vestibule. I was planning on repainting it white but realized the bottom portion is peeling/chipping a lot. How would I go about fixing this door and repainting it? Is it even worth it or should I just get another door? Thanks in advance

 
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11-12-14, 03:15 AM   #2  
First is the door structurally Sound. Joints loose or wiggle in door it's self? Pro will be in later but to start you will have to get all the loose paint off and sand smooth.

 
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11-12-14, 03:18 AM   #3  
I agree with Don, if the door is structurally sound and it isn't an exterior use door (no insulative qualities), it may be worth salvaging. Marksr will be here in a few minutes on the paint thingy.

 
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11-12-14, 03:28 AM   #4  
First how old is the door? While lead based paints haven't been used in decades, if the underlying paint is lead - you don't want to sand into it!!

As long as the door itself is solid it can be salvaged. Either use a chemical stripper and bring it down to raw [or near raw] wood and start over or sand it down enough to be acceptable, prime if needed and repaint.


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11-12-14, 04:15 AM   #5  
The door I think is original to the house which was built in 1952. It's got quite a few costs of paint but not sure if it's lead. I've been scraping off all the loose paint chips. Only one side of the door is chipping. The either side has smooth paint. What kind of chemical stripper would be best? And is it safe to get on the glass portion?

 
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11-12-14, 04:29 AM   #6  
Stop the scraping until it's been stripped.
Use a Citrus or soy stripper, it's safer to use and will encapsulate the lead paint ad make it safe to handle.
Strippers have no effect glass. but getting to close with sandpaper will scratch it.

 
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11-12-14, 04:31 AM   #7  
I don't use strippers all that often so when I do need to strip something I usually ask the paint rep at the store which product would be best for the job at hand. Chemical strippers won't harm glass but will harm plexiglass.

There is a good chance that the original paint on the door is lead based although the only way to know is to have it tested. Lead paint is dangerous when the dust from sanding is inhaled or paint chips ingested. While the odds are that a one time exposure to lead won't hurt you, care should be used to contain/clean up the debris including dust - and wear a mask while sanding!

Is this an exterior door? if so [as Larry said] a new door would seal better and be more energy efficient.


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11-12-14, 04:42 AM   #8  
This is an interior door that separates the vestibule from my living room. There is a heavier exterior door with storm door on the other side of the vestibule. I initially removed this door but I'm starting to feel a cold draft and realize that this door was there to help contain that draft. The part chipping was facing into the vestibule where I assume the cold dry weather aided in cracking the paint

 
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11-12-14, 04:45 AM   #9  
It sounds like you might benefit from replacing the door with a good exterior prehung door. Between the weatherstripping and the threshold it should stop all drafts. I assume the vestibule is unheated. Could it have originally been a porch?


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11-12-14, 08:15 AM   #10  
The vestibule was heated at one point but the steam radiator was removed and capped. Dont think it was ever a porch. The area where the vestibule has a closet area for all of our coats/shoes. so you recommend just replacing the front exterior door and leaving no door between the vestibule and the living room? if that were the case what options do i have for cleaning up the doorway thats currently there since right now there's no door in that doorway? Thanks for the help

 
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11-12-14, 08:27 AM   #11  
I'd keep it and refinish it. If there are no soft spots in the wood it shouldn't be that hard. Add a little weatherstripping and it should make a big difference. Another thread in the same Forum about an old door...and it looks great.

Assuming you have a well sealed exterior and storm door of course.

Why not put a new small rad in the space?


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11-12-14, 08:52 AM   #12  
yea i was definitely thinking of putting the radiator back in that area but my father had already thrown it out. anyone know where the best place to find one would be? its a 1 pipe steam cast iron rads that i have in my home.

 
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11-12-14, 09:05 AM   #13  
Unless you heat the vestibule - keep a door there! I was thinking if the vestibule isn't insulated well and the old door leaks much air, it might be wiser to replace that door with a new unit. Adding weatherstripping as Vic suggested might be enough. If you decide to heat that space and do away with the door there are ways to dress up the opening so it looks good.


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11-12-14, 09:13 AM   #14  
i was feeling around the front door and the leakage is coming from the bottom two corners of the door. everywhere else is sealed up like a button. but the leaks are enough to feel it sitting in the living room.

 
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11-12-14, 09:22 AM   #15  
Does it have any type of threshold? Does the door hit the stop evenly along the length or is there a gap?


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11-14-14, 06:43 PM   #16  
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It has this type of threshold. I don't think I have the correct sweep on the door. Which sweep should I be looking for with this type of threshold?

 
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11-15-14, 04:14 AM   #17  
Your door didn't come with the proper "feather" type sweeps associated with today's doors. They are affixed to the bottom of the door in grooves. How high does the door sit above the threshold wood? Is it inswing or outswing? Looks to be inswing according to the threshold.

 
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11-15-14, 09:25 AM   #18  
Yes the door is in swing and there is no sweep on the bottom off the door. It is attached to the inside bottom of the door and is just a flap. I'd say there is about a quarter of an inch gap from the bottom of the door to the top of the threshold.

 
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11-15-14, 09:29 AM   #19  
I'd consider buying/installing an aluminum threshold on the outside of the door. They sell one that just goes on one side and not under the door.

one like this - http://www.homedepot.com/p/MD-Buildi...8631/100129271


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11-15-14, 11:15 AM   #20  
I assume I would need to remove the current threshold before installing this one, correct?

 
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11-15-14, 12:43 PM   #21  
I was assuming there wasn't a threshold, could you post a pic of what you have?


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11-15-14, 02:08 PM   #22  
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Here u go. This is exactly what I have installed on my front door

 
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11-16-14, 03:39 AM   #23  
So where is it the air coming thru? Have you tried raising the wood strip [via the screws] to make it fit better?


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11-16-14, 07:24 AM   #24  
The air is coming from both the left bottom and right bottom corners. I've taken some pics to show what I'm referring to. Name:  image.jpg
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11-16-14, 10:47 AM   #25  
Does your door stop go all the way down to the threshold?


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11-16-14, 10:50 AM   #26  
There is about. 1/4" gap from the bottom of the door to the threshold.

 
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11-16-14, 11:04 AM   #27  
The door or the door stop? The door stop needs to go all the way down to the threshold. Ideally you'd cut a sliver of wood to match and then insert it with some caulking to act as the adhesive although you could just caulk the gap.


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11-16-14, 02:33 PM   #28  
With an Inswing threshold there does not seem to be a door stop on the threshold. The door deals with the doorstops on the sides and top of the door. Just not on the bottom.


Last edited by Spunky424; 11-16-14 at 03:07 PM.
 
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11-17-14, 03:18 AM   #29  
I think we are misunderstanding each other the door stop is on the jamb and should go all the way down to the threshold [no gap under the door stop] The screws on the wooden portion of the aluminum threshold will raise/lower that piece to help eliminate any draft under the door.


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11-17-14, 05:50 AM   #30  
Newer doors come with weatherstripping accessories that help seal the bottom corners where the transition from the door weather strip to the threshold leaves a small gap as in your last picture. They are basically small pieces of vinyl covered foam that are placed behind the weatherstripping to lift it out so that it meets the door and covers the gap. Here is a link to what Thermatru doors send along with their new installations.

841004 Dust PAD /Corner Seal - Brown All About Doors and Windows, Parts and Hardware

 
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11-21-14, 06:15 AM   #31  
Thanks for this! Looks like a piece I'll def need to get. I replaced the door sweep for a slide on vinyl sweep with multiple fins on the bottom, and that sealed up a lot more than the original sweep.

 
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