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Not a DIY question, but hope someone can advise - window issues


flukeslapper's Avatar
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11-15-14, 06:26 PM   #1  
Not a DIY question, but hope someone can advise - window issues

I had all windows replaced by a respected company (withholding name) a few years back. They are double-pane, with argon gas and low-e glass. Some of the windows are now displaying defects in the low-e film, and the windows look horrible. They also don't perform as advertised, failing to reduce UV and heat penetration. Is this a common occurrence, or did I just get lucky? The windows supposedly have a lifetime warranty, but I've recently heard some bad things about their warranty service. Just want to get all my facts together, just in case this turns ugly. Thanks!

 
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Furd's Avatar
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11-15-14, 09:41 PM   #2  
I don't think it is a common occurrence. Skylights take a larger abuse from the sun than do vertical windows so that might be a little more common. Rather than worry about the warranty situation, just call them and see what happens.

My sister had fogging in a couple of windows in her six year old house (she's the second owner) and the window company replaced the glass without question.

 
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11-16-14, 07:04 AM   #3  
I'm a sub contractor for a well respected national company and will also withhold name.
Lifetime warranty means just that. The first few calls you make may not be addressed immediately. I don't know if this is bad service or just human nature (trying to get out of something). But stay on them and these windows will be replaced. Sometimes you need to call corporate and things start to happen real quick

I have always seen customer concerns addressed eventually though, sometimes even beyond their expectations.


Brian
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11-16-14, 07:06 AM   #4  
Flukeslapper, don't be afraid to mention the manufactuerer. It's not a matter of bad mouthing them but a matter of educating the rest of us. It also helps us to identify your problem.

I for one would very much like to know the maker, since next Spring I will be in the market for new windows. Any info (good or bad) about name brands will be very helpful. At the very least I'll be able to ask the right questions. Besides most name brand makers will stand behind their product and as a result naming them is both to their benefit and ours. Just let us know what their response and/or resolution is.

 
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11-16-14, 07:55 AM   #5  
My windows are lifetime for the original owners. Milguard.


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flukeslapper's Avatar
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11-16-14, 09:09 AM   #6  
Thanks for the encouraging words, guys - I left them a message over the weekend, and will keep you posted on the progress.

 
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11-16-14, 09:20 AM   #7  
They normally stand by the warranty. Remember...there are only 2 or 3 glass manufacturers in the country. They supply to everyone from Marvin to Andersen to Milgard. Unlikely it's an actual glass failure , more likely a manufacturing defect from the window maker...and they'll stand behind that.

Might take a while going through the robo-operator when you call...but it will get fixed, I'm sure.

I do wonder about how you say they failed to perform with the UV and heat? How do you know? Low E coatings work very well, but heat and air leakage are all about the installation.


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11-16-14, 09:58 AM   #8  
As per your PM to me I understand why you choose not to mention the manufacture at this time.

 
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11-16-14, 11:52 AM   #9  
Gunguy45 - my comment about the heat and UV was based on temp measurements I took of an insulated curtain in front of one of the windows, showing over 110 degrees on a 90+ degree day. My assumption is that the heat from sunlight shouldn't have penetrated the e-glass and argon enough to heat the interior curtain that much - especially an insulated curtain. As for the installation, it wasn't what I'd consider world-class. I had to ask the installers to fill large air gaps after they framed out the openings, and they just stuffed some loose fiberglass in the gaps. I had photos, but lost them when a hard drive crashed.

 
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11-16-14, 01:13 PM   #10  
Well, I have to say, the temp reading doesn't seem that out of line to me? Did you do a similar measurement with the old windows? I have low E film (aftermarket) on several of my windows and I can't imagine if they were just regular glass. They let a lost of sunlight through, which naturally heats objects. The cats love a sunny day. No way to compare as this is what they were when we moved in.

Even the most efficient window is still a big hole in the wall.


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