Wool pile alternative on vinyl windows

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  #1  
Old 12-01-14, 11:39 AM
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Question Wool pile alternative on vinyl windows

I've always thought my double-pane vinyl windows were cheap because they let a lot of outside sound in - low & high frequency. When I acquired the house, they were not sealed on the outside to the brick at the edges, and had thin layers of fiberglass as insulation stuffed in. I've tried to tackle the exterior sealing with polyurethane (loctite), adding spray foam (Great Stuff W&D), and caulk (alex plus).

However, the interior caulk does not seem to last more than one season, cracks, and I have to redo it all.

I discovered that a lot of the sound transmission & air leakage occurs where the furry wool pile weatherstripping is on the sashes; especially where the top of the bottom sash meets the bottom of the upper sash. I can practically hear everything with my ear up close, primarily in the corners.

I've been looking for replacement wool pile weatherstripping, but the only stuff I could find wasn't any thicker than what's there to get a tighter seal.

Are there any alternatives to wool pile weather stripping that will still allow mobility of the sashes, but will create a better seal?
 
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Old 12-01-14, 12:33 PM
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Vinyl windows are not a standardized product. Each manufacturer's window sash profile is different so it will be difficult to find something to simply replace what you have. The best bet is to just keep looking. I doubt you will find anything from a big box home center so you might have to look at contractor suppliers or industrial suppliers.
 
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Old 12-01-14, 07:41 PM
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The pile is exactly the type and size it should be. Your problem is more likely an installation problem such as the window being spread in the middle.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 05:22 AM
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XSleeper, would the fix be to install shims between the frame/window towards the middle?

There are 10 windows in the house and all of them have the issue of a poor seal between the sashes when they're closed. It's very plausible whoever installed them just messed up all of them. I haven't been able to find a good resource that allows you to evaluate installation quality.

Pilot Dane, I did find out that the manufacturer is local to me, so gonna try contacting them.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 05:40 AM
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There is a vinyl window manufacturer in my county. They are usually very helpful and have provided parts and bits free of charge. Being nice goes a long way.

What type latches do your windows have. The latches on many vinyl windows actually pull the sashes together when they are camed to the fully locked position.
 
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Old 12-02-14, 06:30 AM
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Shims might help, provided you know what you're doing. Using a single tapered shim will twist the frame more on one side than the other, so if you use tapered shims you usually want to use them in pairs, one facing one way, one facing the opposite way, so that when you slide them one on the other, they get thicker or thinner, depending on how far you slide them.

Some vinyl windows will have jamb shim screws, usually found as a small slotted screw inside the middle portion of the interior jamb track.

When you push out on the jambs of your window they should not be spongy. If they are, they are probably spread. Its simple to check, just tilt the windows down and measure the width of the frame at the top, middle and bottom. All three measurements should be the same. You can do this INSIDE and OUT, since the frame could be twisted.

Some vinyl windows may be installed correctly but will still have noise that channels up the jambs. This is more common in really cheap windows. Some will try and stop the noise with a foam block inside the jamb near the meeting rail, or maybe even on the sill ends at the bottom corners of the window. Can't say one way or the other what your problem is, but a tape measure can easily tell you if they are spread in the middle. Even 1/16" of difference would be too much.
 
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Old 12-03-14, 04:51 AM
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The problem could be a poor quality window. A good window will have interlocks where the sashes meet and a cam locks will pull the sashes together. Compare with the attached photo.
http://sunwindows.com/Images/Feature..._interlock.jpg
 
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