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Window glass inserts


frank otero's Avatar
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01-03-15, 06:20 PM   #1  
Window glass inserts

I currently have double hung, double pane, vinyl windows installed with new construction 6 years ago. We have a lot of these window and all our doors are glass (french doors), so you can imagine.

I want to minimize energy loss - especially draft between windows, tracks, etc.
While researching, I saw some "storm windows" that are installed (compression) on the inside of the windows. From the photos, I am not too impressed with the looks, especially the compression material.
Any feed back on these?

Another thought, a glass insert to go where the removable screen inserts go. Has anyone seen something like this.

I saw the 3M product window film, but I am more concern with drafts. perhaps the 3M be good for the doors.

Regards

 
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01-03-15, 06:31 PM   #2  
Something else is wrong of those windows if there "leaking" air.
Try to move the sashes from left to right, there should only be a tiny bit of movement. To much and the windows going to leak.
Pop off a piece of siding and check to see if they used window tape around the nailing fin.
Pop off a piece of casing on the side of the window to see if they used low expanding foam to seal the gaps.
What makes you think it's the windows?
Had an energy audit done?
New construction just tells me hurry up, cut corners and move onto the next one.
No way should new double pane windows need added storms unless someone screwed up.

 
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01-04-15, 05:01 AM   #3  
I agree with Joe. I don't think your windows are the culprit, but the installation was hasty or poorly done. You must stop the airflow from the outside with window tape and insulate the gap beside the window and framing or you will have air leaks. What joe said regarding popping parts off seems daunting, but it will be necessary to see what is going on.

 
frank otero's Avatar
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01-04-15, 05:28 AM   #4  
I spent all day taking siding off, here is a pix....just kidding. I have not had an energy assessment done, a good idea.

Our house is two story ,about a 1000 ft/sq on each floor. The bottom floor has ten-foot ceilings and 305 ft/sq of windows and French glass doors - we have a lot of glass - I think. I suspect even the top-of-the-line windows, most likely not our case, suffer heat loss at a higher rate than our r-19 insulated walls or foam insulation under our floors.

I am trying to look at options in different areas to make the house more efficientName:  P1010740.jpg
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01-04-15, 05:56 AM   #5  
Is this a picture of your window installation? Seems too modern for 6 years ago, as this method is fairly innovative, leaving the flap of Tyvek on top, with tape under it.

 
frank otero's Avatar
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01-04-15, 06:14 AM   #6  
Yes, it is a modular, and this is the day it was brought in..... late 2008

 
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