need help on raising door threshold

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  #1  
Old 01-08-15, 10:22 AM
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need help on raising door threshold

Hi,

After the hardwood floor is installed, I need to raise the door (to the backyard) threshold by 1-1/2" (the subfloor+hardwood floor height)

I am having some problems. Please see the picture. Under the threshold, there is a piece of wood but it is not all the away across the door width, there is some concrete on the left. I checked the plan, this piece of wood cannot be removed. It is part of some sleeper system (not sure what it does).

What is the common practice on raise the door threshold after hardwood floor installation? Would it be adding another pressure treated wood and glue it? Or using concrete?

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My concerns are:

1) The existing wood (the "sleeper") has some splits/damages. How should I treat it so it will not getting more damage and has better water protection? I will add mortar later but now I want to see if I can repair/treat the damages.

2) The left side concrete and the existing wood are not completely even level. The concrete is about 1/8"-1/4" higher. If I were to use pressure treated wood and glue it to the bottom then it will not be even. I cannot put felt to make it even because I am going to glue it. Should I just add more glue to make the concrete and the existing wood piece even?

Thanks in advance!
 
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  #2  
Old 01-08-15, 11:47 AM
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I'm assuming that's looking from the outside into the home. Can you step back a bit and show a wider view? Are those stairs going down into the yard?

If what I see is correct I think a repair job can be done without the expense and hassle of concrete. I would first clean up that outside stair (?) and threshold (like to see a broader picture) and then use something like water putty to fill in gouges,cracks and rotting wood. Then add a piece of treated wood across to make it even with inside level. It's a cheap fix and there are better ways but this is quick and inexpensive. And I think it will hold up for quite awhile if maintained.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 11:58 AM
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In order for you to get this to the right height, you will need to remove the entire door and frame, possibly raising the entire frame 1 1/2", and cleaning up whatever it is below the door, once you get a clean slate. Door threshold adjustments are usually made before the final flooring is installed, not after.

You would need to build up the bottom utilizing pressure treated lumber, but from what I can't see, I would be remiss in advising all that is needed.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 12:22 PM
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Thanks for your replies. I did some cleanup for better pictures. Please see these two.

It is a French door so there are two of those.

The door goes to the back yard. The near side is the yard ground.

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  #5  
Old 01-08-15, 01:04 PM
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After seeing cleaned up picks, dis-regard what my previous post said. It does not apply. Seems Chandler's has the complete answer. However, there might be a possible alternative. Does the door have enough of a bottom sill to cut it down? If so you could add a piece to the frame to even it out.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 01:34 PM
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The ONLY other way I can see getting this to work without removing the door units, would be to cut out the existing thresholds, shortening the side stiles, inserting blocking and new thresholds at the new height, THEN shortening the doors. It may be a hack job that way, as exterior doors aren't really meant to be modified in height due to the seals on bottom.

I would opt for raising the door units, and possibly new thresholds installed, too, as these look worn a little.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 01:52 PM
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Sure look like the doors are not made of wood that cutting would be in order. Also looks like a stucco house, which complicates the raising of the whole door frame and all. On the bright side, it is an outswing door such that even if things were put back together the way they were, you could still "technically" function with a bigger "hump" on the way in.

Other options are to look into replacing the door with a smaller height door. They make standard doors that are designed to be retro-fitted into older openings that used to house a slider patio door. The rough openings are smaller and in your case, you may be able to make the numbers work with your new floor height.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 02:10 PM
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Oh, that's really a lot of work to lift up or replace the door. I am scared.

I do intend to cut the door shorter by 1-1/2". Is there any problem doing this + add a piece of lumber or with concrete?

I can add some seal to the newly cut door bottom based on chandler's comment.

Thanks.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 02:35 PM
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If a steel or fiberglass door, there is nothing really but foam on the inside. Maybe there is a small rim of wood, but you will loose the structural integrity of the bottom of the door. It will flap everytime it is opened and closed. Right now, the shell of the door wraps around the base of the door. The 90 degree wrap gives if strength.
 
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Old 01-08-15, 03:59 PM
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Yeah, I don't think this is doable without replacing the doors. *if* you can carefully remove them by cutting around them with a sawzall, (will probably destroy the stucco exterior) and can raise the header, then setting them 1 1/2" higher shouldn't be a problem.

I absolutely agree that cutting the bottom of the doors is a bad idea if they are hollow foam filled steel or fiberglass doors.

IMO there wouldn't be anything wrong with making a sloped wood transition stained to match the floor that would set between the closed door and the floor, which take up a lot of that difference. Maybe go from 3/8" angled up to 1 1/8" or something. What's the width you have to work with? 2 1/2 to 3"?
 
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Old 01-08-15, 06:07 PM
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Actually having that step may be a good thing. It will tend to keep out dirt and dust. And as Xsleeper says a nice transition would look good. Personally I would opt for a step type transition as opposed to a slop as suggested. This is one of those situations that you won't likely be able to buy something, but instead you will need to make your own.
 
  #12  
Old 01-09-15, 09:39 AM
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Hi guys,

The door is wood so can be cut. So would you say cut door, add treated lumber, put back the threshold is a good way? If so, how would I go about adding some protection for the existing semi-damaged wood?

Thanks.
 
  #13  
Old 01-09-15, 10:55 AM
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Personally I would not cut the door. But if you do you'll need to seal the cut edge. There are lots of preps for that purpose. As far as repairing and protecting the existing wood you have several choices. One, you could cut out the bad and insert new. Or use something like Water Putty and fill in cracks and holes and rotted portions. Then protect similar as to the cut door.

But really the step is a good thing. It will keep out water during a heavy rain and keep your threshold clean.
 
  #14  
Old 01-14-15, 10:18 AM
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Thanks a lot! I will go check on what they have at home depot.
 
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