wood interior 6 panel doors

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  #1  
Old 02-12-15, 11:09 AM
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wood interior 6 panel doors

I want to replace my old 1961 cheap wood doors throw out my house. I was looking at getting some solid pine 6 panel doors that I can stain to match my floors and moldings. Is it a good idea just to replace the door it self. I do not want to remove the old jams, there fine and they look good all sanded down.

If that's fine where can I get them from? I see them at the big box store but I looked at all the reviews and and there junk and there really not solid and there three types of wood that I know will not stain right. Is there a good brand out there that makes them? and some need to be cut just a little. Every bedroom door is 29.25" wide and closets are 23.5" wide.

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Old 02-12-15, 12:36 PM
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I see them at the big box store but I looked at all the reviews and and there junk and there really not solid and there three types of wood that I know will not stain right
Not sure what you are looking at but I've never seen a wood panel door that wasn't solid wood. Masonite and luan doors are generally hollow core. Most 6 panel wood doors are made out of pine. Since pine is a soft wood it's often beneficial to apply a wood conditioner first so the pine will accept the stain more evenly. You could buy oak panel doors but they will be pricey. Any other species of wood would likely be a custom order.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 12:49 PM
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You probably aren't going to find a real "solid pine" door anymore, unless you want to pay through the nose for it. Almost all solid doors anymore are going to have an engineered "particle board" solid core and pine edges. There will be a limit to how much you can cut off each side before you get into the solid core. If the door knobs are already bored, cutting width off the latch side will hose your 2 3/8" backset. Cutting width off the hinge side will mean mortising the hinges. Hope you have the skills to do that. It's not as easy as you think, which is why many people will just buy a prehung.

Your best bet if you want a higher quality door is to go to a real lumber yard and talk to someone in millwork... they will know what's available in your area and will have a good/better/best price sheet. Don't have them bore the holes for knobs, don't have them mortise the hinges. You will want to do all that after you've ripped the doors down to size. I guarantee that you better be sitting down when they give you a price.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 01:32 PM
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that what I was reading on the big box stores reviews, after a 6 months the seams start to show and come a part. That was the big thing. I mean it's $100 a door there. I saw at a family owned store that sells "JELDWEN" and they seem to be solid, and they make it out of any wood you want, it's a full custom but it comes with the jams and I was going to go there to see if I can get just the door and see what it coast. And that's what I'm worried about, the price being crazy.

the doors I have seen have no cut outs at all. So the nob can go on any side I want.

On this I do not have the skill, I was going to hire a guy that side just do the door, it would be about 45 min. a door to cut and set each on. Then I'll stain them my self.

I always use minwax wood conditioner, color, oil poly, then wax every time.
I'm worried on how it will take the color, I'm using red mahogqny, to match the oak floors I did. The old pine molding it almost a yellow color from it's age after I sand it down, so the color it great and as the red to it. If I go and get a new pine molding it's really white, I sand it and so on and it come out with a brown color. I figure it's mixed wood or something and that's what I'm worried about the box store wood doors also.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 01:39 PM
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Guess you've never went through trying to make a slab door fit an opening.
Whole lot more to it then just "cutting a little off".
What's wrong and what type of doors on there now?
 
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Old 02-12-15, 01:46 PM
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Around here, Home Depot stocks Jeld-wen doors.

Personally, I have had better luck buying a higher quality stain to use on pine... like SW Oil stain. With Minwax it's so runny that a lot of the color wipes right off, but SW seems to have more pigment that stays on the wood. Just my opinion.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 02:42 PM
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after a 6 months the seams start to show and come a part.
That will happen with any solid wood paneled door. It's a matter or temperature and humidity. They expand and contract. Same thing with panels in cabinets or wood flooring.

If you are expecting some magical thing with a different manufacturer, you will be disappointed. They don't have access to wood that was available 50 yrs ago. If it says pine, it's pine. Oak is oak, birch is birch. It's just not old growth wood.

I sold doors and windows for 5 yrs and have installed quite a few. All of them are made the same, unless you go with a small custom maker which is cost prohibitive for most people.

JeldWen is a pretty good brand, but they make theirs just like Masonite or any other company.

You'll want to make sure whatever you decide that the rails and stiles are solid as was mentioned. Sometimes they use a cheaper wood for the frame and apply a (relatively thick) veneer on the face and edges. Still limit's your ability to trim w/o exposing the core.
 
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Old 02-12-15, 02:57 PM
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Sounds like you are going to put a stained door in a painted jamb with stained casing? Sounds odd to me. I would remove at least one set of casings to see what the actual rough opening is. If you can get a standard size into the opening, then the money saved on hiring someone to trim, mortise, cut for a lockset and then hang the door can be put toward an unfinished split jamb door that you can put in yourself. Then you get a factory set door, stainable jamb, casing and slab, predrilled and matched for a lockset. You can install a split jamb door in less than 30 minutes with minimal tools.
 
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